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This is a two part question.

Can I burn .flac to audio cds?

this might seem silly, but I was an early adopter of mp3 players. Think several years before Ipods. I never really had the need to burn too many cds. My girlfriend, however, keeps asking for cds for her cars cd player. I do have a huge collection. Most of which from artists who have a live recording policy. So sorry, no help on illegal downloads from me. So, can I give her great quality music, or will I need to convert these to mp3s? If this is the latter, what format might one suggest? Google seems to indicate that it is indeed possible.

How do I burn these files from the command line?

I am probably going to burn straight from my file-sever, which is headless machine (10.4)? I do have some .cue files, but ironically they seem to point to .wav files, where the files in question are .flac files. Am I able to utilize these .cue files?

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How does your CUE sheet look like? –  zetah Sep 19 '11 at 21:09
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You can make data CD with MP3s (as FLACs probably wont play on any car CD player) or you can convert FLAC to WAV and create AudioCD. Choice is yours –  zetah Sep 19 '11 at 21:10
    
1. Cue sheet looks like every other proper cue sheet i've ever seen. Less the .wav in place of .flac. 2. How would I accomplish this from the command line? –  matchew Sep 20 '11 at 0:43
    
I was asking because it was not clear to me if CUE sheet was referencing one "image" WAV file or separate files. However I'll provide you solution in couple of minutes/hours which I think would be best for your scenario. –  zetah Sep 20 '11 at 15:57
    
ah, I see. its not a single file/img to such a .bin/.cue but instead I have multiple .flac files and the .cue sheet reads as multiple wav files. I have been able to convert to .wav simply by flac -d *.flac, but now I am searching for a command line alternative to write the disc. I did find a solution but it required me finding my write offset of my drive. I was going to research more after work. Thanks –  matchew Sep 20 '11 at 16:05
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Rant:

I would suggest you convert FLAC files to MP3 instead making AudioCD. Why?

  1. You can't possibly notice difference between lame -V 5 (or even lower) and original source listening in a car
  2. You'll save yourself time in the process and save $ on plastic, as space needed would be ~10 times reduced this way, plus you wont need to browse for CDs to find single album ;)

Procedure:

  1. Convert FLACs to MP3 with lame (lame recommends -V2, but in your case I'd go with -V5):

    flac -d -c track.flac | lame -V 5 - track.mp3

    example for processing all FLAC files in current folder:

    for f in *.flac ; do flac -d -c "$f" | lame -V 5 - "${f%.*}.mp3" ; done

  2. Convert MP3 folder structure to Joliet folder structure ISO image
    After you have converted FLAC files to MP3 arange MP3s in folder structure (i.e. /artist/album/track) than make ISO image like this:

    mkisofs -J -o /tmp/MP3-CD.iso /path to root of MP3 folder structure/

    Note: you can't go above 700MB, check for space first

  3. Burn ISO image

    wodim dev=/dev/sg1 -dao speed=8 -eject /tmp/MP3-CD.iso

    Note: Use wodim --devices to check for your device. dev=/dev/sg1 is valid for my system

Voila

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thanks, although your rant is wasted. While I may not be able to empirically argue point one, point two is mute. Space is hardly an issue. its not hard to do rm *wav, but the money on plastic is not a problem either due to my preference to make exact copies of some CDs, I do accept your notion on being able to add more tracks, but it does not apply in my case.... Also any thoughts on burning from the .cue's I have laying around. Anyway +1, I am going to leave this open a few days before accepting an answer. Thanks. –  matchew Sep 20 '11 at 18:52
    
Sorry to read your comment, but you have your preferences. I won't be able to provide you walk through for making AudioCDs with your CUE sheets, because of my already posted answer. Look for cdrdao package, and accompanied documentation –  zetah Sep 20 '11 at 19:47
    
thanks your answer has been helpfull =) –  matchew Sep 20 '11 at 19:55
    
well, I still didn't find precisely what I'm after, but I appreciate the help. Looking at cdrdao it looks rather simple, but i keep recieving the error Pregap Out of Range. I feel this may be an error with the .cue file, but its hard to understand. Thanks. –  matchew Sep 25 '11 at 20:40
    
Something must be wrong with your CUE sheet(s) and there are many ways for it. I guess cue2toc will report same error. You could try cdrtools (cdrecord) as alternative, or just convert files to WAV and make AudioCD without CUE sheet –  zetah Sep 26 '11 at 6:31
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Stumbled upon this old question as I was googling around with the same problem. I think this guide explains pretty well how to deal with .flac & .cue combos, especially with noncompliant .cue.

http://www.bitburners.com/blogs/3

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Welcome to Ask Ubuntu! Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. –  Eric Carvalho Jul 8 '13 at 17:50
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For those that don't need to have a command line option, K3b and Brasero are supposed to be able to do it, however I could not make the latter work on my 12.04 64 bit machine, but it's working fine with K3b.

For this to work you need to:

  • have a .cue file for your image, make one manually if you don't
  • enable the K3b FLAC Decoder plugin
  • install the FLAC++ library (sudo apt-get install libflac++6)

See also the K3b requirements page.

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