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The Ubuntu installer does not allow me to install on NTFS partitions, but certain circumstances requires me to do so. Is it possible?

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Wubi? ... and If the installer allows you to install on NTFS partitions , the filesystem should be changed to ext4 ? am I right? –  Binarylife Aug 2 '11 at 7:24
    
I won't be running Windows. –  Oxwivi Aug 2 '11 at 7:33
    
I see, I don't think there is a way to do it. –  Binarylife Aug 2 '11 at 7:38
    
Which circumstances require NTFS? You can install Ubuntu on ext* and use another partition (NTFS) for those circumstances... –  user22129 Aug 2 '11 at 7:47
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@13east, 4 GB file size limit is not a limitation I can entertain. –  Oxwivi Aug 2 '11 at 15:39
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No. NTFS doesn't support Linux file permissions so you can't install a Linux system on it.

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No ugly hacks either? –  Oxwivi Aug 2 '11 at 7:35
    
Maybe somewhere there exists some hack that implements a Linux file system on top of NTFS like UMSDOS did on top of FAT, but I've never seen that. –  Florian Diesch Aug 2 '11 at 11:48
    
Sounds promising, any hints as to where I can find more info about such stuff? –  Oxwivi Aug 2 '11 at 13:30
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It does not work in that manner. You won't be able to install Ubuntu onto an NTFS partition - the permissions systems just do not work on that type of partition. –  Thomas W. Aug 2 '11 at 15:17
    
@Oxwivi POSIX Overlay Filesystem seems to do this. –  Florian Diesch Aug 2 '11 at 17:44
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I'm not sure what your "certain circumstances" are, but you are better off resizing the partition and letting Ubuntu have its own space. You can always resize/move the Ubuntu partition later.

You cannot install Linux on an NTFS system for security, technical, and other reasons (for example, NTFS is supported by a user-space driver).

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Also, symbolic links are not supported by NTFS and are required. –  NRoach44 Nov 1 '11 at 7:58
    
@NRoach44: you can add your own answer if you like :)... –  RolandiXor Nov 1 '11 at 15:06
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Supposedly, wubi is an Ubuntu installer which allows to "install and uninstall Ubuntu in the same way as any other Windows application" - I never tried this but I suppose the whole partition is contained in a file which can be on an NTFS drive.

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/ubuntu/windows-installer

I'm pretty sure it's not possible to install Ubuntu on an NTFS partition in the traditional sense of the word - i.e. as a stand-alone OS which directly accesses the drive etc. For one thing, filesystem permissions models are quite different etc.

However, you can access NTFS partitions from an Ubuntu which is installed on a, for example, ext4-partition.

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But there's no Windows for me to install Wubi in... –  Oxwivi Aug 2 '11 at 7:33
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If you don't have windows, why do you need NTFS? Just forget it. It's like you want to install Windows on ext2/3/4, even if you don't have any Linux to support ext* filesystems :) But anyway, in theory, it's not totally impossible to install on NTFS: you can create a big enough file on the NTFS, which is used as a loopback mount (so that file will be the ext3/4 "inside"). However, I am not sure if there is simple method to do this ... Even in that case, from Linux's view point, it's installed on ext2/3, just it's only a file on NTFS then ... –  LGB Aug 2 '11 at 13:01
    
Wubi only works because it creates a disk blob partitioned as a drive with EXT3 installed inside of that disk blob. Ergo blob exists on NTFS partition. But it's more of a disk inside of a disk then Ubuntu on NTFS –  Marco Ceppi Aug 2 '11 at 14:56
    
@Marco, can we bind folders from a live USB's disk blob to some folder in the NTFS partition? –  Oxwivi Aug 2 '11 at 15:46
    
@Oxwivi Over my head at that point. –  Marco Ceppi Aug 2 '11 at 15:47
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