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I'm looking for a command that would give me the same info as

cat /proc/cpuinfo 

Except for the GPU (type of the chip and memory, frequency)

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

That type of information is non-standard, and the tools you will use to gather it vary widely.

The command glxinfo will give you all available OpenGL information for the graphics processor, including its vendor name, if the drivers are correctly installed.

To get clock speed information, there is no standard tool.

  • For ATI/AMD GPUs, aticonfig --odgc will fetch the clock rates, and aticonfig --odgt will fetch the temperature data.
  • For NVIDIA GPUs, the nvclock program will fetch the same information.

I am not aware of an equivalent tool for the open source drivers or for Intel or other GPUs.

Other information on the hardware can be fetched from the lspci and lshw tools.

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A blog post focussing on work done on the command-line is here:

http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/howto-find-linux-vga-video-card-ram/

Find out the device ID:

 lspci | grep VGA | cut -d" " -f 1
03:00.0

You can then use this output with lspci again, forming two nested commands

lspci  -v -s  $(lspci | grep VGA | cut -d" " -f 1)

Output from my system:

03:00.0 VGA compatible controller: NVIDIA Corporation G98 [Quadro NVS 295] (rev a1) (prog-if 00 [VGA controller])
    Subsystem: NVIDIA Corporation Device 062e
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 24
    Memory at f6000000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=16M]
    Memory at ec000000 (64-bit, prefetchable) [size=64M]
    Memory at f4000000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=32M]
    I/O ports at dc80 [size=128]
    [virtual] Expansion ROM at f7e00000 [disabled] [size=128K]
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: nvidia

So, (prefetchable) [size=64M) indicates that I have a 64-MB NVIDIA card. However, I don't, it's rather 256 MB. Why? see below.

To see how to get the most info+performance out of it, read an extremely comprehensive article on the Arch-Linux Wiki

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/NVIDIA

For nvidia users, start with

nvidia-smi


Thu Dec 19 10:54:18 2013       
+------------------------------------------------------+                       
| NVIDIA-SMI 5.319.60   Driver Version: 319.60         |                       
|-------------------------------+----------------------+----------------------+
| GPU  Name        Persistence-M| Bus-Id        Disp.A | Volatile Uncorr. ECC |
| Fan  Temp  Perf  Pwr:Usage/Cap|         Memory-Usage | GPU-Util  Compute M. |
|===============================+======================+======================|
|   0  Quadro NVS 295      Off  | 0000:03:00.0     N/A |                  N/A |
| N/A   73C  N/A     N/A /  N/A |      252MB /   255MB |     N/A      Default |
+-------------------------------+----------------------+----------------------+

+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Compute processes:                                               GPU Memory |
|  GPU       PID  Process name                                     Usage      |
|=============================================================================|
|    0            Not Supported                                               |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+

This indicates that I have a 256 MB GDDR3 Graphics card.

At this time, I don't know how to get this for Intel and AMD/ATI GPUs.

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+1 for nvidia-smi (that should be highlighted a bit in my opinion) –  moose Sep 7 at 15:23

Run google-chrome and navigate to the URL about:gpu If chrome has figured out how to use openGL, you will get extremely detailing information about your GPU.

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For the Intel GMA950 (comes with EeePC in particular) you can run:

setpci -s 00:02.0 f0.b

which will return '00' for 200MHz, '01' for 250MHz or '03' for 400MHz. You may be able to apply the same principle to other Intel cards.

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I do not know of a direct equivalent, but lshw should give you the info you want, try:

sudo lshw -C display

(it also works without sudo but the info may be less complete/accurate)

You can also install the package lshw-gtk to get a GUI.

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Had to put gksu before the command in the menu to get lshw-gtk to work. –  robin0800 Feb 15 '11 at 10:55

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