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When editing any file f.e. like this:

r@ngf:~$ sudo gedit /etc/default/grub
[sudo] password for r: 

(gedit:1638): Gtk-WARNING **: Attempting to store changes into `/root/.local/share/recently-used.xbel', but failed: Не удалось создать файл «/root/.local/share/recently-used.xbel.CJP8XV»: Нет такого файла или каталога

(gedit:1638): Gtk-WARNING **: Attempting to set the permissions of `/root/.local/share/recently-used.xbel', but failed: Нет такого файла или каталога

(gedit:1638): Gtk-WARNING **: Attempting to store changes into `/root/.local/share/recently-used.xbel', but failed: Не удалось создать файл «/root/.local/share/recently-used.xbel.W8MHYV»: Нет такого файла или каталога

(gedit:1638): Gtk-WARNING **: Attempting to set the permissions of `/root/.local/share/recently-used.xbel', but failed: Нет такого файла или каталога

(gedit:1638): Gtk-WARNING **: Attempting to store changes into `/root/.local/share/recently-used.xbel', but failed: Не удалось создать файл «/root/.local/share/recently-used.xbel.DZG7XV»: Нет такого файла или каталога

(gedit:1638): Gtk-WARNING **: Attempting to set the permissions of `/root/.local/share/recently-used.xbel', but failed: Нет такого файла или каталога

It is shows some errors, but this doesn't affect on the editing actually -- files saves normally. So what that errors could mean?

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1 Answer 1

First, you shouldn't use sudo with GUI programs. Use gksudo instead.

As for the warnings: they are harmless. They just say that gedit tries to save a file at a location that does not exist. If you want to make them go away, you got to create that location:

sudo mkdir -p /root/.local/share
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Hmm... interesting, that's the first time I hear that with gui programs I have to use gksudo. –  rulet Jul 10 '11 at 9:32
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You don't have to, but it's strongly recommended. Using sudo, the $HOME variable will stay /home/your_user, probably causing files written to your home directory as root user - something you don't want. Using gksudo on the other hand, the $HOME variable will be set to /root. –  htorque Jul 10 '11 at 9:52
    
sometimes the sudo command is more useful for a GUI application, especially with regards to troubleshooting, or if you need your own directory to be set as $HOME. Using either doesn't do much harm, gksudo is just considered the proper way to do things in GUI –  Conor Rynne Jul 10 '11 at 10:45
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