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How can I use UbuntuOne synchronization on a desktop running Linux but not Ubuntu? For example on Fedora or Linux Mint?
Is there a way to achieve that?

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3 Answers 3

Yes, there is nothing to prevent that. It'll need to be packaged for that distro, but no other customization should be required. The software is written in Python, uses gnome-keyring by default and synchronizes desktopcouch instances (desktopcouch is also written in Python and depends on normal couchdb). All this is available on any distro.

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Currently there is no support from Canonical for other distros or even DE's, and only a few people have tried to get one working:

http://www.linux-magazine.com/Online/News/Ubuntu-One-Clients-for-KDE-and-Fedora

As far as I understand, the Fedora one does not currently work. Like jo-erlend said, it may just run if you get the software. You can get it from launchpad:

https://launchpad.net/ubuntuone

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On a personal note: once they make an OS X version and get a working RPM going, I will probably switch from JungleDisk to Ubuntu One. –  senshikaze Jul 5 '11 at 16:43

I signed up for 20GB on Ubuntu One when I got my new Zareason Netbook several months ago, which runs 10.10. I also have it on my Android phone. But at work and my home Linux box, I run Fedora. I'd really like to sync all my devices, and while I will try compiling the client from Launchpad, if I can't get it working, I think I'll have to switch to the platform-agnostic Dropbox. Canonical will lose my subscription if this happens, of course. If they are going to develop for Windows, why not for non-Debian *nix platforms?

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