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I am in Ubuntu 10.10. I am also using compiz fusion for animation. My Delete key is not deleting any text. When I press Delete, my currently opened window moves to first Ubuntu desktop/workspace.

I think some program has bound this key. How can I determine if this is the case?

Alt + Ctrl + Delete is working fine.

How do I restore the Delete key's default functionality?

Best regards.

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What's your xmodmap(1) output look like? How about xmodmap -pke | grep Delete? –  sarnold Jul 4 '11 at 8:42
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migrated from stackoverflow.com Jul 4 '11 at 9:42

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2 Answers

You can run this in a gnome-terminal and hopefully find the plugin that's stealing your Del key:

for i in $(gconftool-2 --get /apps/compiz-1/general/screen0/options/active_plugins|sed "s/\[\|\]//g"|sed "s/,/ /g"); do echo "# $i:"; gconftool-2 -a /apps/compiz-1/plugins/"$i"/screen0/options | grep "_key\|_button\|trigger_\|initiate\ \|panel_first_menu\|keyboard_focus\|execute_command\|show_launcher" | grep -v "Disabled\|=[[:space:]]*$" | sort; done; echo -e "\n# metacity overrides:"; gconftool-2 -a /apps/metacity/global_keybindings | grep -v "disabled\|cycle\|switch_panels" | sort; gconftool-2 -a /apps/metacity/window_keybindings | grep -v "disabled" | sort
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You can open a terminal and run the program 'xev'. This will open a plain looking window that will capture all the events the Xserver sends to this window. You can move the mouse into this window and press the delete key. This is what I see in my system:

xxx@xxx:~$ xev
[... many lines from mouse movement ...]
KeyPress event, serial 35, synthetic NO, window 0x1800001,
    root 0xa7, subw 0x0, time 649387, (-4,16), root:(439,52),
    state 0x0, keycode 119 (keysym 0xffff, Delete), same_screen YES,
    XLookupString gives 1 bytes: (7f) ""
    XmbLookupString gives 1 bytes: (7f) ""
    XFilterEvent returns: False

KeyRelease event, serial 35, synthetic NO, window 0x1800001,
    root 0xa7, subw 0x0, time 649497, (-4,16), root:(439,52),
    state 0x0, keycode 119 (keysym 0xffff, Delete), same_screen YES,
    XLookupString gives 1 bytes: (7f) ""
    XFilterEvent returns: False
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This will just show you the keycodes, keysyms, etc. Very useful if you're trying to map a key using xmodmap(1), but less useful for discovering which program has stolen your key mappings. –  sarnold Jul 4 '11 at 8:41
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