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After I've installed some language packs and spell checking dictionaries (I'd like to use with Firefox and OpenOffice) I've got tons of language variations installed. This makes very inconvenient to maintain dictionary additions, for example. Sometimes Firefox decides to switch to Australian, sometimes to UK dictionary, sometimes to US, etc.

For me, a Russian, English is just English, and German is just German. I think every English-speaking will understand me, may I write "color" or "colour", "dialog", or "dialogue" (I usually prefer classic UK spelling though, as a matter of a habit (as I was taught at school)). How to remove all those dialects?

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5 Answers 5

Emi Bcn from Launchpad said:

Look at /usr/share/hunspell/ and delete all files you don't need/want. It's all!!

It worked for me except just in case I went to myspell and aspell folders too and erased the ones I didn't need.

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Warning: It seems you must keep the current locale. I tried this and now echo | hunspell returns exit code 1 and prints the following error: "Can't open affix or dictionary files for dictionary named "en_AU"". –  l0b0 Apr 12 at 15:18

The problem is known, take look at bug 28226 and its duplicates. Feel free to vote for the bug using the "This bug affects me too" feature.

To summarize, English in Ubuntu means all variants (en-au, en-za, etc.), not just one. You could delete the individual spelling packages, myspell-en-* and hunspell-en-*, but that would also remove language-support-en, and I don't think that's what you want.

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sudo apt-get install bleachbit

Then open bleachbit as a root, the first time it prompts you for the locales you want to left behind.. then, mark the corresponding checkbox under "system".

Click on "preview", then on "delete"

and that's it :)

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Thanks, I'll try this. –  Ivan Oct 3 '10 at 20:48
    
Did it work? If yes, please accept the answer. –  Agmenor Jul 29 '11 at 13:19
    
Do not use bleachbit! A mistake can result in data loss, unwanted changes in configuration or a misbehaving desktop. –  Cumulus007 Aug 30 '12 at 8:47

To backup all non-US English dictionaries (remove --no-act after verifying what it'll do):

sudo rename --no-act 's/$/.bak/' /usr/share/hunspell/en_!(US).{aff,dic} 

Then restart your browser and only US English shows up.

In the case of languages which are redundant since the files are symlinks to the canonical language files (like fr_BE):

sudo find /usr/share/hunspell/ -type l \( -name '*.aff' -o -name '*.dic' \) -exec mv {} {}.bak \;
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Though @chuo is correct that you can just delete the files in /usr/share/hunspell/ for locales that you don't want, much better is to uninstall the packages that deliver those files. To see the locale packages that you have installed, run

dpkg --list | grep "myspell-"

then for each locale you'd like to remove uninstall the package with a command like this

sudo apt-get remove myspell-en-au

For my Ubuntu 14.04 installation I had myspell-en-au, myspell-en-za and myspell-en-gb which I uninstalled with the command

sudo apt-get remove myspell-en-.*
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