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I'd like to upgrade my server from Ubuntu 12.04 LTS to 14.04 LTS.

However I have a small number of 3rd party applications, looking at their PPA list I foresee I could have trouble. So I am here to ask which is the safest migration path.

A quick list:

ls /etc/apt/sources.list.d

nginx-stable-precise.list
nginx-stable-precise.list.save
ondrej-mysql-experimental-precise.list
ondrej-mysql-experimental-precise.list.save
ondrej-php5-precise.list
ondrej-php5-precise.list.save

Considering I see "precise" in the above listing, do I have to do something particular in order to have those PPAs switched over to their "trusty" version? Or shall Ubuntu be so smart to detect that and deal with it? I have checked and all those PPAs have a corresponding "trusty" distro version available.

Or, do I have to manually remove the PPA references in apt, upgrade to 14.04 and then add the PPAs again?

What I am asking is really a checklist about what to do before and after the upgrade in order to not break anything.

Finally, what if I wanted to stop using the PPA version of say nginx and just use the 14.04 bundled native nginx? Do I just remove the PPA reference before the upgrade or what?

Thanks in advance

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you start a release upgrade, the upgrade tool disables all PPAs (it comments out the source lines from these files). You will have to manually enable them after the upgrade, either by editing the files and uncommenting the lines, or using the Software Sources tool. In either case, you will have to change the entry from precise to trusty yourself. So if you wish to stop using the PPA version for some PPA, don't do anything, just upgrade. :)

If existing packages have an upgrade path, they will get updated (so nginx will be upgraded to whatever version is available for 14.04), irrespective of where they came from. If existing packages have no installation candidate in the new release, and don't conflict with anything else, they are left as is. If you use something like Synaptic or Aptitude, these will show up as local or obsolete packages.

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Thank you. In case I want to re-enable some of those now disabled PPAs do I just follow the same procedure I used to install them or do I really have to go find files and edit them? And where do I find those files in the /etc/apt/sources.list.d directory or also somewhere else? –  Dario Fumagalli Aug 14 at 9:50
    
Another question: if I don't re-enable PPAs, do the corresponding packages get uninstalled? Or are they "dead" and will never get an update again? Or do they somehow become "normal pagkages" and will start getting updated by Ubuntu when it's the case? Example: nginx. Since the package exists in default Ubuntu: if I have its PPA disabled, will nginx still start? Will it start getting updated in the default regular Ubuntu way? –  Dario Fumagalli Aug 14 at 9:58
    
If existing packages have an upgrade path, they will get updated (so nginx will be upgraded to whatever version is available for 14.04), irrespective of where they came from. If existing packages have no installation candidate in the new release, and don't conflict with anything else, they are left as is. As for re-enabling, you don't have to edit the files directly, the Software Sources GUI offers a convenient interface - but mass editing is easier over CLI. –  muru Aug 14 at 10:00
    
Yeah but our 14.04 server is hosted and has no GUI –  Dario Fumagalli Aug 14 at 10:20
    
@DarioFumagalli ouch. It's not a big problem, you can use sed to quickly enable the entries you want. –  muru Aug 14 at 10:22

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