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How can I make my main user which I log into, an administrator just like in Windows XP?

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marked as duplicate by Eliah Kagan, Alaa Ali, Tim, mikewhatever, guntbert Aug 9 at 19:16

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The purpose of sudo is to provide the function of administrator, without leaving the computer open to be exploited (at privileged-account level) when the user opens a file, goes to a website, or attaches a device. That is a weakness (or flaw) in Windows XP, and one more reason why that OS is no longer safe (or supported). –  david6 Aug 7 at 3:00
    
@david6 I think that is a great comment. Would you mind providing that as an answer? –  Akiva Aug 7 at 3:04
    
Akiva, this question has been answered many times before. –  amanthethy Aug 7 at 3:09
    
@amanthethy You should flag it as a duplicate. In my quick search, I could not find it. –  Akiva Aug 7 at 3:09
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Take note that even though they've shown how to do it, the first line of the solution advises AGAINST enabling the root account. askubuntu.com/questions/44418/how-to-enable-root-login –  amanthethy Aug 7 at 3:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That is not the question you should be asking.

The purpose of sudo is to provide the function of administrator, without leaving the computer open to be exploited (at privileged-account level) when the user opens a file, goes to a website, or attaches a device.

Note: That is a weakness (or flaw) in Windows XP, and one more reason why that OS is no longer safe (or supported).

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I don't think this is actually one of the reasons Windows XP is no longer supported. That OS was released in 2001 and EoL'd in 2014. It's very rare for an OS release (from any vendor) to be supported that long. Most Ubuntu and OS X releases that have ever existed (to give two other OS families as examples) were released after, and reached end-of-life before, Windows XP. Windows XP is no longer supported because perpetual vendor support for any single release is impractical. And the main reason Windows XP is longer safe to use is that it no longer receives security updates (because it's EoL). –  Eliah Kagan Aug 7 at 4:51
    
My comment was about the security model for XP, not its age or support period. –  david6 Aug 8 at 0:44

But you already have it. You can sudo with your own password, not root's. This can be set for any user in System Settings - User Accounts.

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