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I have a fine dual boot system (WinXP || Trusty14.04) with a /dev/sda already maxed out in terms of number of primary partitions (sda1, sda2, sda3, sda4).

Partition   Start      End         Size             Type          File system   Flags  
  sda1      32.3kB    44.0GB       44.0GB          primary         ntfs  
  sda2      44.0GB    44.5GB       500MB           primary         ext3         boot  
  sda3      44.5GB    52.5GB       8000MB          primary         swap   
  sda4      52.5GB    187GB        135GB           extended  
  sda5      52.5GB    72.5GB       20.0GB          logical         ext3  
  sda6      72.5GB    175GB        102GB           logical         ext3  
  sda7       175GB    187GB        12.5GB          logical         ext3  
  unalloc    187GB    201GB        14.0GB          ------          ---- 

I want to resize and move things around on my internal device /dev/sda, while booted from /dev/sdb. I use GParted.

I have 14 GB of unallocated space, at the end of the partitioned space on /dev/sda, that is after the extended partition /dev/sda4.
I want to reclaim that unallocated space, for instance adding it to my sda6, which in my case happens to be /home. I seem to be stuck because MS-DOS part-table scheme does not allow more than 4 primary partitions and every time I try to resize the last logical partition sda7 (inside the extended partition sda4) to use a little or all of the unallocated space, GParted tells me it hits a wall.
I also tried copying /dev/sda7 onto the unallocated space, evidently to no avail, because that would violate the 4 primary partitions ceiling.

Is there a way out?
Or is it that short of a fresh reinstall I have effectively LOST 14GB of perfectly good storage space?
That would not be so bad, if a bit-to-bit copy of the /dev/sda described above on a much larger /dev/sdb new drive (to be used as boot), had not left more than 350GB of unallocated space in the exact same configuration. 350GB of SSD storage space beyond my system's reach (short of a complete reinstall) is clearly unacceptable.

I noticed that although the whole of /dev/sda seems unmounted, sda5 has a its mount point on / and seems to be mounted. When trying to unmount it to resize the extended partition /dev/sda4, I cannot. Instead I get an error message to the tune of: "Most likely other partitions are also mounted on these mount points. You are advised to unmount them manually."

Note: I have seen other posts and answers, but they either do not answer my question or seem not to receive a satisfactory answer as in here and in here. In the latter, I tried waltinator's method but GParted does not let me move sda7 to the end of the unallocated space. I am stumped. Any help appreciated.

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I just noted that although the whole of /dev/sda seems unmounted, sda5 has its mount point on / and seems to be mounted. When trying to unmount it to try to resize the extended partition /dev/sda4, I cannot. Instead I get an error message to the tune of: "Most likely other partitions are also mounted on these mount points. You are advised to unmount them manually." –  Cbhihe Jul 10 at 10:19
    
... and so, when trying to unmount /dev/sda5 manually with > umount /dev/sda5, the command line throws me: umount: /dev/sda5 is not mounted (according to mtab) .... What would be the next step here ? –  Cbhihe Jul 10 at 10:23
    
OK ! Lame mistake. I booted from my just cloned /dev/sdb, not realizing that mount-points on that and on /dev/sda are exactly the same. So the running Ubuntu on /dev/sdb mounted its root volume sdb5 on / and GParted confused that with /dev/sda5 being mounted. As a result I could not add the available unallocated space to sda4. -- So ! Running Gparted from a Live CD Ubuntu did the trick as both sda and sdb could be manually unmounted.. Waltinator's recipe works perfectly well. MATTER CLOSED. –  Cbhihe Jul 10 at 10:54

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