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Am the administrator of my Ubuntu system. Recently I added a new user account. But when ever the user tries to access or open the 'Volumes'(Drives where movies, songs and other files are stored) it asks for the Administrator's password. I created the user account to my other family members and I don't want to tell them my password.

So is it possible to allow them to access the Volumes without asking Administrator's password ?


UPDATE 1:

Ubuntu was installed alongside Windows in my system. I will provide a screenshot of the Volume details -

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UPDATE 2:

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Have you tried un-mounting the device from your admin account, then re-mounting it under their account? –  Jonah May 29 at 16:29
    
@Jonah What you mean by that ? –  TomJ May 29 at 16:30
1  
It is an NTFS Volume or an ext2/3/4? Can you post the output from sudo fdisk -l please and add it to your question. –  TuKsn May 29 at 16:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First install sudo apt-get install gnome-system-tools

Than open the account manager:

enter image description here

Click on "Manage Groups" then create a new group and add your two users:

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(if you don't want to install a GUI for groups you can create a new group from command line)

Now we have to change the /etc/fstab run:

gksu gedit /etc/fstab 

and add for the first Volume (at the end of the file):

/dev/sda5 /media/Volume1 ntfs rw,auto,user,exec,nls=utf8,dmask=027,fmask=137,gid=1002,uid=1000 0 2

"gid" must be the group id from your new group.

"dmask" are the permissions for the directories:

  • 0 at the beginning is for the owner (in this case the user with the id 1000 should be your admin user) he has all permissions ( 0 -> read, write and execute)
  • 2 as the second digit is for all users in the group 1002 ( 2 -> read and execute)
  • 7 at the end is for others ( 7 -> no permissions )

"fmask" are the permissions for the files: 1 -> read and write 3 -> read only 7 -> no permissions

For more info look also at this answer http://askubuntu.com/a/54324/265974


Edit:

Mountpoints for the other partitions:

/dev/sda6 /media/Volume2 ntfs rw,auto,user,exec,nls=utf8,dmask=027,fmask=137,gid=1002,uid=1000 0 2
/dev/sda7 /media/Volume3 ntfs rw,auto,user,exec,nls=utf8,dmask=027,fmask=137,gid=1002,uid=1000 0 2
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Will the user be able to delete or add files, if I did like you said ? –  TomJ May 29 at 18:12
    
@Tom Ok i changed it now the user in the group can only read files. –  TuKsn May 29 at 20:13
    
What you mean by this - "Click on "Manage Groups" then create a new group and add your two users:" ? Who are the 2 users ? Is it the administrator and the user ? –  TomJ May 30 at 14:57
    
You can add your admin but it is not necessary because if he has the uid 1000 he as full access to the partition. –  TuKsn May 30 at 16:40
    
I said as you did. But now the user is not able to access 2 partitons - sda5 and sda6. Why did this happened ? –  TomJ Jun 2 at 14:26

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