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On my console the color for directories is such a blue, that it is hard to read on a dark background.

How can I change the color definitions for ls?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To change your directory colors, open up your ~/.bashrc file with your editor

nano ~/.bashrc

and make the following entry at the end of the file:

LS_COLORS=$LS_COLORS:'di=0;35:' ; export LS_COLORS

Some nice color choices (in this case 0;35 it is purple) are:

Blue = 34
Green = 32
Light Green = 1;32
Cyan = 36
Red = 31
Purple = 35
Brown = 33
Yellow = 1;33
white = 1;37
Light Grey = 0;37
Black = 30
Dark Grey= 1;30

The first number is the style (1=bold), followed by a semicolon, and then the actual number of the color, possible styles are:

0   = default colour
1   = bold
4   = underlined
5   = flashing text
7   = reverse field
40  = black background
41  = red background
42  = green background
43  = orange background
44  = blue background
45  = purple background
46  = cyan background
47  = grey background
100 = dark grey background
101 = light red background
102 = light green background
103 = yellow background
104 = light blue background
105 = light purple background
106 = turquoise background

All possible colors:

31  = red
32  = green
33  = orange
34  = blue
35  = purple
36  = cyan
37  = grey
90  = dark grey
91  = light red
92  = light green
93  = yellow
94  = light blue
95  = light purple
96  = turquoise

These can even be combined, so that a parameter like:

di=1;4;31;42

in your LS_COLORS variable would make directories appear in bold underlined red text with a green background!

You can also change other kinds of files when using the ls command by defining each kind with:

di = directory
fi = file
ln = symbolic link
pi = fifo file
so = socket file
bd = block (buffered) special file
cd = character (unbuffered) special file
or = symbolic link pointing to a non-existent file (orphan)
mi = non-existent file pointed to by a symbolic link (visible when you type ls -l)
ex = file which is executable (ie. has 'x' set in permissions).
*.rpm = files with the ending .rpm

After you alter your .bashrc file, to put the changes in effect you will have to restart your shell.

Source:

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LS_COLORS

This is a collection of extension:color mappings, suitable to use as your LS COLORS environment variable.

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