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Firstly, Wi-Fi works 100% of the time on my Ubuntu netbook, my Android phone and my Windows install (on the same computer/USB-wifi device), so I don't think this can be a router issue... It would be strange if it were a driver issue as it sometimes connects, but FYI the USB-wifi device is a Edimax EW-7318USg.

Second, if it does connect (during this session) then it connects first time, else it will not connect (no matter how long I try). Wi-Fi does connect about 20% of the time (restarting the computer about 5 times usually allows me to connect). Once it has connected it stays connected (until restarted).

Obviously it is hugely irritating! Any ideas how I can remedy this?

EDIT: As requested, the results of running sudo lshw -class Network:

description: Ethernet interface
       product: MCP77 Ethernet
       vendor: nVidia Corporation
       physical id: a
       bus info: pci@0000:00:0a.0
       logical name: eth0
       version: a2
       serial: 00:19:66:d3:fe:21
       capacity: 1Gbit/s
       width: 32 bits
       clock: 66MHz
       capabilities: pm msi ht bus_master cap_list ethernet physical mii 10bt 10bt-fd 100bt 100bt-fd 1000bt-fd autonegotiation
       configuration: autonegotiation=on broadcast=yes driver=forcedeth driverversion=0.64 latency=0 link=no maxlatency=20 mingnt=1 multicast=yes port=MII
       resources: irq:41 memory:fcf7c000-fcf7cfff ioport:c880(size=8) memory:fcf7e400-fcf7e4ff memory:fcf7e000-fcf7e00f
  *-network
       description: Wireless interface
       physical id: 1
       bus info: usb@1:2
       logical name: wlan0
       serial: 00:0e:2e:4d:ff:b4
       capabilities: ethernet physical wireless
       configuration: broadcast=yes driver=rt73usb driverversion=2.6.38-8-generic firmware=1.7 ip=192.168.2.6 link=yes multicast=yes wireless=IEEE 802.11bg

Is this a known bug or should it be filed as one? (if so, which or against what?).

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closed as off topic by fossfreedom Feb 27 '12 at 19:34

Questions on Ask Ubuntu are expected to relate to Ubuntu within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
google didnt bring up any hits for that model - are you sure if it is correct? Please add to your question the results of sudo lshw -class Network –  fossfreedom May 27 '11 at 21:54
    
My mistake, I misread the S for an 8, it's actually an EW7318USg. Thanks! –  hayd May 29 '11 at 8:45
    
@fossfreedom I have corrected the device name in the question, and inserted the results of sudo lshw -class Network. Many thanks. –  hayd May 29 '11 at 8:57
    
This question should instead be filed as a bug report, and as such is off-topic, thanks! Instructions here. –  bodhi.zazen Feb 27 '12 at 19:22

1 Answer 1

Find out if any log entries are helpful - I usually do:

touch $HOME/now

Record the time right now. Then, make the event happen (or, wait until the event happens, doing periodic touch $HOME/nows.

Then, after the event has happened, do find /var/log -cnewer $HOME/now to get a list of the log files that were changed between the most recent touch $HOME/now and the find command. Look at the last N lines of each.

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