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I have a large music collection, and a good number of playlists that I have formed over the years. All the music is neatly organised in a folder hierarchy.

I have managed to get my hands on higher quality versions of multiple albums, and would like to replace the low quality ones with these. But, that would mean that I have to build my playlists again from the scratch, as the new filenames will not be recognise in the old playlists. What is the best option for me to proceed?

One of the ways I thought would work was to see which filename of in new album is closest to the old one, and then rename it with the old filename (i.e. file named 01-Highway-to-Hell.mp3 in new album would be closest to highway_to_hell.mp3 in the old album). How do go about doing this renaming?

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Take a look at this, does it help? –  Mitch Mar 31 at 6:21
    
It doesn't help that much, as I manually have to figure out the file pattern in the each of the old albums' subfolders. This would be the lost resort if nothing else turns out –  3l4ng Apr 1 at 7:08
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1 Answer 1

To rename a file, open Files and go to the folder the files are at. Then, left click on the file, and select Rename...

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that would mean manual renaming of every single file. Not something I'm willing to do for around a 1000 files –  3l4ng Apr 1 at 7:09
    
If you would like to do it in an automatic way, your files would need to have a pattern, so you could use a wildcard, maybe. –  joseeantonior Apr 4 at 17:33
    
yes, but in that case, I'd have to figure out the wildcard manually for each of the folders, and they're around 150 in number –  3l4ng Apr 5 at 18:15
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