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My Specs Inter Core 2 Duo (2.7 Ghz) 1 GB DDR2 Intel Graphics Swap Memory 256 MB

Its running too slow Single text file is not opening up in less than a minute

Checked system monitor CPU and memory are fine but some time swap is at 100% but still slowness is all the time

Windows-7 with so many services installed works quite well but ubuntu freezes too much even when i open 3 tabs in mozilla

Thinking of increasing swapping size but time taken in opening a file even when swapping is at 4%

I have 64 bit OS in my system I know many will say i should have install 32 bit but the issue is i downloaded iso 0f 32 bit intel but then time of install it was not taking that iso file and i had to download 64 bit file and then it got installed

Now what are the suggestions

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closed as too broad by Braiam, Lucio, Avinash Raj, blade19899, Jorge Castro Jan 9 at 14:01

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Please be more detailed. Which Ubuntu and which program do you use to open that file? Also post the file. –  Danatela Jan 9 at 2:53
    
Ubuntu 12.04 and using txt file and its the default editor for that. –  Chirag Jan 9 at 9:03

4 Answers 4

The Intel Core 2 Duo is a 64-bit processor, so using a 64-bit OS should be the way to go.

It seems to me like your swap is too small. Ubuntu is designed to start using Swap before your RAM is filled all the way up. From what I've seen, the suggested size of your Swap partition is equal to your amount of ram.

Here is more info on Swap - Ubuntu Wiki Swap FAQ

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3  
Just a clarification, 64-bit operating systems are for using RAM greater than 4GB. If the computer has less than 4GB, even if the architecture supports 64bit, it's often worse off (especially in the case of 1 to 2GB) because a 64bit OS has a larger memory footprint for all programs running on the computer in comparison to a 32bit OS. Rule of thumb here is to use a 32bit OS when you have anything less than 4GB of RAM. –  Brandon Bertelsen Jan 9 at 3:23

With 1GB RAM, you might want to have a look at another desktop than Unity, such as Xfce or LXDE. They're much more light-weight and will leave you with much more RAM for the actual applications you use and should provide much better performance.

All your software and stuff will be just the same, you just log in using a different desktop.

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Your config should be able to run things decently indeed...

If it's a memory issue, you should start by checking if there is any process eating it up, either using the graphical System Monitor, or by running top from the console (then press f, select %MEM with up/down, then press s to sort by mem and q to return to the process list).

Then investigate based on your findings.

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  • With only 768 MB memory (1024-256) you really should be using a 32 bit operating system. With so few ram 64 bit is clearly a bad choice, as 64 bit programs use more memory than 32 bit ones.
  • With that few RAM you shouldn't use Unity, so switch to a lighter desktop environment/GUI.
  • You should try to set in your BIOS the shared memory of your integrated VGA to only 128 or 64 MB instead of 256 MB. Giving 256 MB from 1 GB of system memory to the graphics is a bad choice.
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