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I would like to use Ubuntu on a virtual machine so that I can run an open source engineering software called OpenFoam.

I need instructions for a layperson. I didn't know what a virtual machine was two days ago, I don't know what an image file is, etc. I'm used to downloading software and using it.

Every website I visit that claims that its instructions are for "dummies" provides instructions that I don't understand.

I thought I'd just click on the orange 64 bit button on the Ubuntu website for 13.10, that it would download and that I'd somehow install it on a virtual machine. That download looks like it would take 10+ hours.

Can anyone help me with lay-language?

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marked as duplicate by Mitch, falconer, Radu Rădeanu, Jorge Castro, karel Jan 8 at 22:25

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1 Answer 1

The most simple steps are:

  • Download VMWare and install it. This is the program that will allow you to create and run virtual machines.

  • Download Ubuntu 13.10 by clicking the orange button. This is a large file (883Mb) and will take some time, like you mentioned. You definitely need this file. It's often called an "ISO" or a "disc image", as it can be copied onto a CD. You aren't putting it on a CD, though, just downloading it.

  • Run VMWare and follow the instructions to create a new Virtual Machine. You will normally keep all of the default settings, but under "Guest" you should choose "Ubuntu" and "64-bit". It will ask for "installation media" or a "disk image" - this is where you select the Ubuntu 13.10 ISO file that you downloaded in the second step.

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