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Is there any links/tutorials/videos that helps me share files between Ubuntu and Mac OSX?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A bit of Google-fu found a guide for Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid) and Mac OS X. I haven't got a Mac handy to test on, so haven't tested it I'm afraid - unless you want to buy me one... ;)

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1  
Bravo! Was looking for that info since October 20, 2004! –  ring0 Jan 3 '11 at 15:59
    
@fluteflute hi, The link is broken, is there another one? –  Luis Alvarado Jun 19 '13 at 16:33
    
@LuisAlvarado: have updated with a archived version of the page. Of course it's three years old so the method may no longer work. –  8128 Jun 20 '13 at 7:57

Setup a Samba Server in Ubuntu

In OSX:

  • Open a finder window and hit cmd-K
  • Type 'smb://ipAddress' where 'ipAddress' is your ipaddress
  • Select the share you're connecting to (as per the samba setup)
  • Authenticate
  • It should mount the share the same as it mounts anything else

In Windows:

  • Configure your firewall to allow smb connections if it doesn't already
  • Open Start->Run
  • Type '\ipAddress' where 'ipAddress' is your ipaddress
  • Authenticate
  • Under the 'Network Places' folder the shared folders should appear

Here's a really long drawn-out explanation for windows including how to setup the server in *nix.

Samba is basically Windows NFS (Network File System) that is completely cross platform and easier to setup/use.

Note: There is a GUI tool for configuring Samba but I can't remember how to access it off the top of my head. Also, I think you can connect to Samba in OSX under connect-to (or something similar) from the top bar menu but I can't remember exactly what it's called since I haven't used a mac in over 6 years.

IMHO, this method is a lot easier and straight forward to use than FTP because it mounts the remote folder as if it's a local folder on your system. It doesn't get much more transparent than that.

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uh... Windows? Question is about Mac and Ubuntu.. I don't know how, but I am pretty sure you doesn't need Samba to connect a Mac and a Linux box. If I am wrong, please point me out. –  H_7 Feb 26 '12 at 21:44
    
What my experience is, is that AFP on Ubuntu using netatalk is way slower than Samba. –  Koen. Sep 19 '12 at 10:34
    
Although this contains extra info re:Windows it simply solves the connection issue with a Mac by using smb://ipAddress No extra module installation required! AFP is fine, but then you have the reverse issue of getting Windows machines connected. –  Duncanmoo Sep 27 '13 at 7:09

If you have a secure local network, it's really the easiest and most reliable, to use an ftp server, also accessible from almost any platform, if you happen to have visiting windows users etc.. https://help.ubuntu.com/10.04/serverguide/C/ftp-server.html

Also most media devices will be able to use ftp if it ever comes to that.

To connect to an ftp server is really simple from a mac http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNP48LcNV0Y If you really need to write to the ftp from the mac (finder fails and mounts as read only) check. http://anoved.net/2008/03/macfuse-ftp-and-you/

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Samba works well in my setup, a home network with three Macs and a server running Ubuntu (since 9.04, currently at 10.10). The Ubuntu machine automatically shows up in the Finder along with the other Macs.

I followed this install guide for the Samba setup. The guide is for Ubuntu server, but it's the same setup and it works the same for the desktop version.

The only change I made was to set the "create mask" to 0777 ("world writable") instead of 0755, otherwise creating folders on the Ubuntu machine from the Macs didn't work properly.

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Building on what's been said already, I was able to share files from Ubuntu to Mac just by right clicking the folder I want to share and enabling sharing.

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If you want a simple type of sharing, you could use Teamviewer, Skype or Yahoo Messenger + gyache in both machines.

Then you could send the file you want. However, this method is relatively slow.

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I accomplished this by doing the following:

I have a Mac OS 10.4 (Tiger) on a G5 PowerPC and Ubuntu on an Acer Aspire One.

  1. In mac OS, go to system preferences>sharing and enable "Personal File Sharing"

  2. In Ubuntu open DashHome and open "Files" folder. (or however you know how to get to the files folder.)

  3. In the sidebar, choose "Browse Network"

  4. As long as the two machines are on the same network, your mac should be in there as a directory that you can mount within Ubuntu.

I had very little idea what do do, having only ready this page, and it turned out pretty easy. It works for me, sharing files within a home office. It wouldn't work if you need to work remotely because you would be off your own network.

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I figured out a simple way to connect Ubuntu 13.10 to my imac OS X.

  1. First, I disconnected Wi-Fi on both computers because I wanted to transfer masses on data on cable Ethernet.
  2. Then just plug the Ethernet cable directly between both computers. OS X automatically connects to Ethernet (light turns green in network preference pane on Ethernet). It automatically gives you the IP address and net mask.
  3. Then, in Ubuntu should appear an auto eth in network connections.
  4. Edit this connection by going to ipv4, put on manual, add address (enter IP address and net mask, leave gateway empty, just click in it and leave it to zero, I want to be able to save).
  5. Then check the "require ipv4 addressing...." at the bottom. I left everything else untouched in the connections edit.

Then it worked, both computers connected. But to access the folders on my mac, it didn't work immediately, I had to wait a bit. But then it all worked! and now I'm transferring files at 23 mb/sec.

have fun

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2  
Are you using an Ethernet crossover cable, or are the two computers connected by cable to a router? –  user68186 Jan 2 at 16:23

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