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I observed the following thing:

  1. I login on my computer account.
  2. I run in the Terminal some-app
  3. I wait about 20 seconds to start.
  4. Then I close it.
  5. I run same command in terminal.
  6. It start in about 1 or 2 seconds.

I understood that this is called cache. Can anybody explain how does this work?

Also, what command must I run to make a fake start of the some-app to start quickly when I want to open it in UI?

I imagine that having a list of app names that I would pseudo-start on login will improve my Ubuntu experience.

Note that I don't want to start the application in the UI, just to initialize it somewhere in the background so when clicking the icon from the desktop to start very quick.

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Can you give as example an application with such behavior? –  Radu Rădeanu Nov 7 '13 at 20:00
    
If your programs take 20 seconds each to start the first time and you want to start, say, 10 of them in the background when you login, wouldn't that make your system even more sluggish for possibly many minutes after you login? –  Mark Plotnick Nov 7 '13 at 21:12
    
@RaduRădeanu All the apps have this behavior on my machine (I don't say that it's a good computer, but Windows 7 was very fast on it). After one year of Ubuntu experience I decided to ask this. For example chromium-browser, but even VIM does same thing (about 5 seconds at first start). –  Ionică Bizău Nov 8 '13 at 12:08
    
@MarkPlotnick No, because they can be started same time. For example if I start (after login) chromium, firefox, skype and terminal all of them will be started after 20 seconds. If I start only chromium, only chromium will be started after 20 seconds. Anyway, I want to find the answers to my questions, so to be able to test them. –  Ionică Bizău Nov 8 '13 at 12:11

2 Answers 2

If you want to run some apps on the start up, try to add this apps on the end of the '~/.profile' file. For example, if you want to run thunderbird on the start up, just add 'thunderbird &' on the end. It worked for me.

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This doesn't answer to my questions. I don't want to start the application in the UI. I want just to initialize it somewhere in the background so when clicking the icon from the desktop to start very quick. –  Ionică Bizău Nov 7 '13 at 19:18

a simple way to do the same thing and add programs to your session start up, just press ALT+F2 or type in terminal "gnome-session-properties" and add your "some-app" there. Hope it helps. EDIT : you can simply add this line to your startup : gnome-terminal -x top this runs a terminal and executes the command top on it ...

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