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Is it possible to install Ubuntu on the new Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro? I have checked the Lenovo compatibility lists on the Ubuntu site, but no new entries have been created yet for this model (released mid-October).

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I rewrote my Installation guide for Ubuntu below: How to install Ubuntu on Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 2 Pro –  rubo77 Jun 19 at 19:47
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11 Answers 11

up vote 24 down vote accepted

just bought (last week) one (yoga 2 pro - i7 - 8 GB ram - 256 SSD) and have installed ubuntu 13.10.

It comes with a small button on the side of the power button to enable the BIOS edit and boot sequence... When you press it, the computer powers up with the config menu. Then you have to edit the BIOS to unsecure UEFI mode. It was really easy.

To boot the ubuntu you have to edit the grub's boot line before the quiet parameter, adding: acpi_backlight=vendor

and after installing ubuntu, in the /etc/default/grub file, you have to add the same acpi conf in the 11th line:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="acpi_backlight=vendor quiet splash"

and execute the: sudo update-grub2 command

and that's it...

  • at first, wireless was hard blocked and I tried out everything to enable it (rfkill unblock, kernel upgrade to 3.12, and nothing worked)

In order to use it without wireless, I bought the J5 usb 3.0 gigabit ethernet adapter... it works without any configuration.

I found some posts online saying that they have solved this by reinstalling windows, unblocking the wireless card via software, and then going back to linux. I removed all partitions and I am not planning to reinstall windows.

The funny thing was that iwlist wlan0 scan worked... so that was very strange...

Today I installed wicd to replace the network manager and the wireless start working !!!!!! the only thing that was needed was to copy the resolv.conf from the ubuntu location to /etc (replacing the symbolic link)

cp /run/resolvconf/resolv.conf /etc/

Also the brightness function key is not doing nothing... but I don't care about that... :-)

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replacing /etc/resolv.conf is not recommended. See askubuntu.com/questions/239169/… –  guntbert Oct 31 '13 at 18:03
    
See this for more info on fixing the wireless issue: scrye.com/wordpress/nirik/2013/10/18/… –  Anake Nov 1 '13 at 15:28
    
i'm assuming that the screen resolution, etc., worked out just fine with the system? –  Dan G Nov 2 '13 at 11:10
    
Dan G: the screen resolution goes up to 3200x1800 (and the image is sharp), the sound is also working, I use an mini HDMI to VGA adapter (for use with projectors) and it is working fine, webcam is working (I am having trouble with the webcam in skype, but it is working with other programs)... and I didn't mention before: I am using ubuntu 13.10 64 bits. Today, using Anake's post, I blacklisted the ideapad_laptop module and the network manager started working. With this, I could return the resolv.conf as a link and the wireless is working !!! Thanks Anake and Guntbert !!!! –  Deco Nov 2 '13 at 15:52
    
Brightness function keys worked for me out of the box with Ubuntu Gnome [which is not necessarily the best desktop choice for such resolution]. –  Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Nov 17 '13 at 7:57
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I would just like to add to the rest of these answers that you can simply get wireless working with the command

sudo rmmod ideapad_laptop

You can have this persist by adding ideapad_laptop to a blacklist, but this may remove some compatibility (although I have yet to run into these problems).

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What does this accomplish? I'm trying to get wireless working and I'm working in the dark. What is ideapad_laptop and why is it holding things back? –  Amanda Jun 25 at 18:09
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How to install Kubuntu on Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 2 Pro

I have installed Kubuntu 13.10 32bit just now (tried 64bit too, but crashes with kernel panic!) and these are the steps I had to do to install Kubuntu:

  1. I started Windows and resized the Windows partition so I got 100GB free.
    (If you plan to attach a Hi-Res monitor, you should install PowerStrip on Windows to get the monitor running there and get the correct Linux Modeline Parameter for your monitor.)

  2. It comes with a small button on the side of the power button to enable the BIOS edit and boot sequence... When you press it, the computer powers up with the config menu. Then you have to edit the BIOS to unsecure UEFI mode.

  3. I chose "Legacy Boot"

  4. To boot Kubuntu you have to edit the grub's boot line before the quiet parameter, adding: acpi_backlight=vendor
    (I installed from an USB-stick, created with UNetbootin. In The UNetbootin boot menu press [TAB] to edit options and add that parameter to the boot line.)

  5. Run KDE from USB pressing "Try Kubuntu". You have to enable WiFi with sudo rmmod ideapad_laptop
    (for an easier handling during install adjust the speed of the touchpad somewhat slower: Settings->"Input Devices" set "Cursor Motion"->"Acceleration Factor" to 0.02 and set the Font dpi in Settings->"Appearance"->Fonts to 250 dpi).
    Then I chose "Install KDE".
    In the partitioning menu I chose manual partitioning and created two partitions:

    1. 100 MB for a special partition that is needed for booting (not a /boot partition but some special type: "biosgrub" called "Reserved BIOS boot area")
    2. 100GB for root / as ext4
    3. swap is not needed with 8GB RAM, (but if needed, you can add a swap as file later)
  6. I connected to a WiFi Network

  7. After reboot everything was fine (no need to adjust grub any further) The only problem left is, that I have to enable WiFi after each system start with sudo rmmod ideapad_laptop so I added that to the modprobe blacklist with:
    sudo su
    echo '#added to enable WiFi on Yoga 2 Pro'>>/etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf
    echo 'blacklist ideapad_laptop'>>/etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf

  8. Since everything is really tiny now, I adjusted some Font settings:

    1. Set the dpi in Settings->"Appearance"->Fonts to 250 dpi and log out and in again.
    2. Adjust Firefox and Thunderbird to a High DPI touchscreen display (retina)

    3. Adjust the height of the KDE-Controllbar at the bottom with the button on the right to the desired height, then all icons grow with the height

  9. To attach my external high resolution monitor I tried to connect Crossover High Res. Monitor to Intel HD Graphics 4400 , but the monitor doesn't work yet.
    Another Monitor with FullHD resolution works fine, but using it as dual monitor is hard, cause on that screen now everything is huge. Maybe it will be possible to have two different DPI configurations for two different screens

  10. Boot to Windows 8.1 again:
    In this setup grub doesn't show Windows 8.1 in the list. But it still easy: if you want to enter your Windows partition, you have to use the small button on the side of the power button (that enables the BIOS edit and boot sequence): there you can still boot to Windows

  11. I defined the font to 230 dpi so everything looks fine (everything but some apps that are running in java.)

  12. Some problems are still open:

13. Finally after some days the window decorations in KDE were all gone! And I couldn't configure them back. So I decided to apt-get install ubuntu-desktop ;P.

So I continued How to install Ubuntu on Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 2 Pro

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How to install Ubuntu on Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 2 Pro

I got a Yoga 2 pro - i5 - 8 GB ram - 256 SSD (I first have installed Ubuntu 13.10 32bit (tried 64bit too, but crashes with kernel panic!), but I guess now Ubuntu 14.04 64bit will just run fine.)

These are the steps I had to do to install Ubuntu:

  1. Prepare the installation

    1. I started Windows and resized the Windows partition so I got 100GB free.

    2. It comes with a small button on the side of the power button to enable the BIOS edit and boot sequence... When you press it, the computer powers up with the config menu. Then you have to edit the BIOS to unsecure UEFI mode.

    3. choose "Legacy Boot"

    4. To boot Ubuntu you have to edit the grub's boot line before the quiet parameter, adding: acpi_backlight=vendor
      (I installed from an USB-stick, created with UNetbootin. In The UNetbootin boot menu press [TAB] to edit options and add that parameter to the boot line.)

    5. Start Ubuntu from USB (or external CD-drive) and press "Try Ubuntu"

  2. When Ubuntu is started from USB, open a console to enable WiFi with sudo rmmod ideapad_laptop. Then connect to a WiFi Network and Install Ubuntu

  3. After reboot everything was fine (no need to adjust grub any further) The only problem left was, that up to now I had to enable WiFi after each system start with sudo rmmod ideapad_laptop so I added that to the modprobe blacklist with:

    sudo su
    echo '#added to enable WiFi on Yoga 2 Pro'>>/etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf
    echo 'blacklist ideapad_laptop'>>/etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf

  4. Now in Ubuntu In 14.04 with Unity everything works fine. Also, it seems like Ubuntu is adopted better to touch-screens. I only had to adapt the Screen DPI in System Settings->"Displays"->"Scale for menu and title bars" to 2.0

  5. Adjust Firefox and Thunderbird to a High DPI touchscreen display (retina)

  6. adjust the jumpy trackpad and lack of middle button:

Edit the file /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/50-synaptics.conf and edit the "touchpad catchall" section, so it will look like this:

Section "InputClass"
    Identifier "touchpad catchall"
    Driver "synaptics"
    MatchIsTouchpad "on"
    # This option is recommend on all Linux systems using evdev, but cannot be
    # enabled by default. See the following link for details:
    # http://who-t.blogspot.com/2010/11/how-to-ignore-configuration-errors.html
    MatchDevicePath "/dev/input/event*"

    Option "FingerLow"              "46"
    Option "FingerHigh"             "46"
    Option "ClickFinger1"           "1"
    Option "ClickFinger2"           "2"
    Option "ClickFinger3"           "3"
    Option "TapButton1"             "1"
    Option "TapButton2"             "2"
    Option "TapButton3"             "3"
    Option "AreaBottomEdge"         "85%"
    Option "SoftButtonAreas"        "60% 0 85% 0 40% 60% 85% 0" # Btn2 LRTB - Btn3 LRTB
    Option "EmulateMidButtonTime"   "75"
EndSection

(source: http://memobadz.wordpress.com/2014/02/16/lenovo-yoga-pro-2-on-ubuntu/ )

7. Add Screen rotation support on Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga

Since the Screen doesn't turn when you turn the laptop, create the script /usr/local/bin/rotate-screen.sh from rotate-screen.sh

in System Settings -> Keyboard -> Shortcuts:

  • Assigned Alt+F5 to the command /usr/local/bin/rotate-screen.sh
  • and Alt+Shift+F5 /usr/local/bin/rotate-screen.sh -n

add rotate screen to keyboard shortcuts

To be able to manually turn the screen from the launcher add a .desktop-file like described here

8. Additional useful Hardware for Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 2 Pro:

I got a "HooToo HT-UE01 USB 3.0 HUB 3-Port with RJ45 10/100/1000 Gigabit Ethernet LAN" that works fine (tested on Ubuntu 32bit) on my Yoga 2 Pro

9. Enable some extra power save settings

Edit your rc.local startup-script with sudo gedit /etc/rc.local so the end part looks like this:

# By default this script does nothing.

#####################################################
# tune all power save settings to >good<
powertop --auto-tune
# all power save settings are fine but the one for the touchpad
# disable powertop >good<-setting for touchpad 
echo 'on' > '/sys/bus/usb/devices/2-7/power/control'

#####################################################
# optional disable bluetooth and wifi on each start 
# this can always be re-enabled in the top appletts if you need it

# disable bluetooth:  (uncomment the following line)
#rfkill block bluetooth

# disable wifi: (uncomment both following lines)
#sed s/^WirelessEnabled=true/WirelessEnabled=false/ -i /var/lib/NetworkManager/NetworkManager.state
#rfkill block wifi

exit 0

If you want to dim the screen brightness to 50% on each startup:

 sudo apt-get install xbacklight

Then add this command to your startup programs (gnome-session-properties): xbacklight -set 50

10. Optional:

  • Since the battery time is several days in suspend mode, you could set the power-button option to 'suspend' with gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.power button-power 'suspend'
  • Make your Grub boot menu pretty
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One more thing:

If you buy a yoga 2 pro, be aware of the display resolution of 3200x1800!

Gnome, KDE and Xfce are not yet ready for such crazy resolutions. The only workaround for me was to lower the resolution to full hd, so the text was still readable.

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Screen res is not really a problem in KDE; try overrriding the font DPI and set to 180 and increasing icon sizes. Finally smooth fonts!! –  dhardy Nov 19 '13 at 15:18
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I tried 12.04.3 64bit but didn't work.

13.10 64 bit worked with the above described modifications.

Another fellow has a guide for the install: http://datainfer.wordpress.com/2013/11/21/install-ubuntu-on-ideapad-yoga-2-pro/

In my case I want dual boot but the Ubuntu installer didn't detect the Windows installation so I choose "Something else" in the Ubuntu installer and created in my empty space (left space when I did my Win install) as ext4 and mount as / (root) and select this as spot to install boot.

Be sure you know what you do in the "Something else" Window of the ubuntu installer.

To modify /etc/default/grub after the install I select recovery mode in Grub and first run the fix grub error (to mount the disk in write mode) follow by the root console to edit the file via

sudo nano /etc/default/grub

for wifi follow the above tips.

For Hi DPI/ HiDPI / High resolution

I used GNOME 3.10 and it seem to handle the high dpi better than Unity: Install Gnome 3.10 in Ubuntu 13.10 without breaking Unity

For Firefox I played around with "about:config" and layout.css.devPixelsPerPx

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What will the "about:config" and layout.css.devPixelsPerPx do? Maybe the Firefox addon NoSquint and Fix for zoomed default-font will fix your problems? –  rubo77 Jun 20 at 15:53
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I'm running Ubuntu 13.10 on my Yoga 2 Pro. I think it's great! Battery life is 6+ hours. The yellow colors are a bit off, but it doesn't much bother me; the recent BIOS fix does not fix the color in Ubuntu. I have done a few things in addition to what's already been mentioned.

I've tweaked the touchpad settings, I created a file /etc/X11/Xsession.d/80xinput with the contents:

xinput set-prop "SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad" "Device Accel Profile" 2
xinput set-prop "SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad" "Device Accel Constant Deceleration" 4
xinput set-prop "SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad" "Device Accel Adaptive Deceleration" 4
xinput set-prop "SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad" "Device Accel Velocity Scaling" 8
xinput set-prop "SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad" "Synaptics Finger" 35 45 0
xinput set-prop "SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad" "Synaptics Coasting Speed" 5 15
xinput set-prop "SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad" "Synaptics Tap Time" 120
xinput set-prop "SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad" "Synaptics Tap Move" 300
xinput set-prop "SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad" "Synaptics Noise Cancellation" 20 20

Also I scaled the screen back a bit with the following:

xrandr --output eDP1 --scale 0.7x0.7

Ubuntu is happily booting in UEFI, and I can dual boot Windows 8.1 through Grub.

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Did you leave the installed Windows 8 on it? Or did you reinstall Windows? And can you specifi, what you tweaked at your touchpad exactly? –  rubo77 Feb 27 at 22:33
    
You can see all properties with xinput list-props "SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad" –  rubo77 Feb 28 at 6:54
    
Some of these parameters are fully documented here: x.org/wiki/Development/Documentation/PointerAcceleration But I cannot find documentation for "Tap Time" –  rubo77 Feb 28 at 7:04
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I just bought one yesterday and can confirm that the hardware works flawlessly if you follow the suggestions on this page. Also Standby works out of the box.

BUT: as Michael Schär pointed out, missing High-DPI support in X11 is a big issue. I am actually returning the device because of this. there are two basic solutions but none of them really fully work:

1.) Use a lower Resolution and have the display interpolate everything. Works great, but makes everything blurry. If you just buy a Full-HD 13" Laptop rather than setting a low resolution on a Quad HD notebook, you end up having a cripser image. So why spend the extra $$ just to get a worse result?

2.) I usually run Xubuntu with xfce, but i have tried Unity and KDE as well and it is the same story with all of them: Increase Font DPI, use a High-DPI theme like TGC-Huge or Husky, increase Icon sizes, increase launch-bar size etc.: this gives you finally a readable and sharp appearance, but it totally messes up the appearance of different applications. One major issue is, that the default window size of a newly launched application is still the same as with the small icons and fonts, so in GIMP for example, you have to manually resize the window to see the full menu bar, also, the tool icons in GIMP are still tiny. Firefox needs an extra setting to scale up webpages, but that should work okay, Gnumeric shows tiny cells and they increase in size once you write something into them as the font is now huge compared to the cell size.. this messes up your sheets. the overall appearance just doesn't look right anymore and there is something wrong with almost every application.

So for me the decision is clear, i will return the laptop and get a cheaper Full-HD one which provides more desktop area to work with but is still readable and proportionally correct. I really hope that the missing High-DPI support will be added to our favourite Window Managers and the X-Servers soon.

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I used PowerTOP to analyze and reduce battery power consumption on my Yoga 2 Pro. Here are the steps to automatically apply the optimizations.

Create script file /usr/share/powertop_optizations.sh (don't forget to make it executable) with the following commands

#!/bin/sh -e

##############################################
# PowerTOP tweaks
##############################################

# VM writeback timeout
echo '1500' > '/proc/sys/vm/dirty_writeback_centisecs';

# Enable SATA link power Managmenet
for sata_host in `ls /sys/class/scsi_host/host*/link_power_management_policy`; do
    echo 'min_power' > $sata_host;
done

# NMI watchdog should be turned off
echo '0' > '/proc/sys/kernel/nmi_watchdog';

# Autosuspend for USB devices
for usb_dev in `ls /sys/bus/usb/devices/*/power/control`; do
    echo 'auto' > $usb_dev;
done

# Runtime PM for PCI Devices
for pci_dev in `ls /sys/bus/pci/devices/0000:00:*/power/control`; do
    echo 'auto' > $pci_dev;
done

# Using 'ondemand' cpufreq governor
/sbin/modprobe cpufreq_ondemand > /dev/null 2>&1
for cpu_core in `ls /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu*/cpufreq/scaling_governor`; do
    echo 'ondemand' > $cpu_core;
done

##############################################

exit 0

In order to apply these optimizations every time the laptop switches to battery power create script file /usr/lib/pm-utils/power.d/z_powertop

#!/bin/sh

# true == Battery
# false == AC

case "$1" in
    true)
    echo "Applying powertop optimizations"
    /usr/share/powertop_optizations.sh || echo 'Failed!'
    ;;
    false)
    ;;
esac

exit 0
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great work, how can you get the script from power top suggestions ? –  Postadelmaga May 1 at 21:58
1  
@Postadelmaga here is good explanation: How do I make Powertop changes permanent –  Alexander Gololobov May 3 at 19:59
    
BTW, kernel 3.14 has got Haswell CPU support in intel_pstate cpufreq driver. This dramatically improves idle power consumption. I'm getting 10+ hours battery lifetime with 20% brightness. –  Alexander Gololobov Jun 1 at 18:02
    
What "brightness issue" are you referring to? And is this still needed (and tested) on Ubuntu 14.04? If not, please add Ubuntu 13.10 as title to your answer –  rubo77 Jun 19 at 20:46
1  
@rubo77 I'd suggest the following: Install laptop-mode-tools first and then while running on battery look at PowerTop 'Tunables' tab to see if something in 'Bad' state. –  Alexander Gololobov Jun 20 at 8:18
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Lenovo generally works fine, so go ahead and give it a try. I assume you're asking this before you buy it. If so, you'll probably be able to return it within a few weeks if it doesn't work.

So go ahead. The only thing you might have problems with is UEFI secure boot.

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Thanks, yes, I'm just trying to prevent any headaches, because I'd like to order directly from the site. –  Dan G Oct 29 '13 at 16:34
    
I've got a Lenovo U310, and the Ubuntu 13.04 64bit iso didn't even need me to do anything with Secure Boot. You should be fine. –  Novine Oct 29 '13 at 16:35
    
If I helped, please choose my answer, or upvote, or something like that. –  Novine Oct 29 '13 at 16:36
    
Check the wifi card, SD card ports, non-integrated graphics cards etc for compatibility - THEY ARE AN UTTER PAIN OTHERWISE. Apart from that, my Lenovo G570 works just fine . –  Wilf Oct 29 '13 at 17:21
    
Lenovo tends to have a BIOS check that the wifi-card is from Lenovo, otherwise the machine won't boot - so "generally works fine" is a little broad. –  asjo Nov 29 '13 at 19:29
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I'll add my experience as well. As this was the first time dual booting with UEFI, I wasn't as familiar with how to setup grub and such. My experience was Ubuntu "got it right" without too much trouble. I didn't change anything in the BIOS, I adjusted the drive size from Windows, then rebooted into the live USB, and when partitioning came up, selected "Something else" and created a /boot and a / partition. Thats it, I didn't mess with any existing partitions and the yoga worked great. Now I can use grub to select windows or (default) boot Ubuntu, but also, I can use the Novo button to select Windows if you so desire as well. Just thought I would put it out there for those who wondered how much work was involved in keeping Windows with Linux, answer: not much.

I'll just second the blacklisting of ideapad-laptop and the acpi_backlight=vendor boot option as good "basics."

Also, Unity is handling the resolution better than I even expected.How to find and change the screen DPI? is a great framework to find your preferred DPI settings. I had to play with it a little bit but found a good setting I can live with. By the way, I uses 277 and my DPI setting and text-scaling-factor as 1.6 but that is just my preference, I like small text!

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