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I found the /proc folder with >2000 subfolders and a kcore data with 140TB. All created at the same time. What is this? All the folders are named from 1 to 2634 and have all 44 subentries...

Using ubuntu 12.04 Thanks


The problem appears when i try to back up my entire system... but when i back up, it seems try to backup the kcore file (which is 130TB, so impossible to do) any suggestions? Thanks

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If you had problems to create a backup of your system, would be nice to at least say how/what software are you using to create the backup... –  Salem Sep 28 '13 at 17:04
    
Using LuckyBackup (which uses rsync). –  Spot Ify Sep 28 '13 at 18:01
    
Following command: rsync -h --progress --stats -r -t --modify-window=1 -l -D --update --include=/ --exclude=**/*tmp*/ --exclude=**/*cache*/ --exclude=**/*Cache*/ --exclude=**/*Trash*/ --exclude=**/*trash*/ --exclude=/media/ExternalDevice/ / /media/ExternalDevice/Backup/ –  Spot Ify Sep 28 '13 at 18:02
    
has andybody any idea? –  Spot Ify Sep 29 '13 at 16:47

1 Answer 1

The /proc filesystem is a virtual filesystem that contains file representations of information about the running system. In other words, they do not really exist on any disk, so you should generally ignore it unless you have a reason to tweak some of the settings it provides access to.

The numbered directories contain information about running processes. The kcore file allows access to the entire kernel virtual address space, which is 128 TB on amd64.

Other virtual filesystems include /dev and /sys.

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the problem is when i want to backup my system, the kcore file takes soooo long to be backed up... –  Spot Ify Sep 28 '13 at 7:39

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