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This question is an exact duplicate of:

How do I upgrade Ubuntu 12.10 to Ubuntu 13.04 using a bootable USB? S

I have a laptop, this is dual boot, Ubuntu 12.10 and Windows 7. I want to upgrade to 13.04 using bootable USB.

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Where is the actual problem? What happens if you boot from USB? –  Manuel Sep 23 '13 at 5:48
    
I don't have problem, because I was not try it yet. I just want to know how to do that using USB Bootable disk? I want to know too, the usual problem will come if I am using this option. Thanks –  Andrias Meisyal Sep 23 '13 at 10:15
    
have you seen this? askubuntu.com/questions/287118/… –  amc Sep 24 '13 at 6:40
    
I have seen this. Maybe, there are another solution, replacing or accumulating ubuntu 12.10 to ubuntu 13.04? –  Andrias Meisyal Sep 24 '13 at 13:12
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marked as duplicate by Warren Hill, Alaa, Eric Carvalho, guntbert, Braiam Sep 25 '13 at 1:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1 Answer

I wrote this as a technical document on April 25th, 2008; I just used this exact method to install Ubuntu 13.04 on a WD external USB 2 TB harddrive and it worked flawlessly. I will give you this one piece of advice... **

follow this to the letter and it will work for you and if you do not I am not responsible for the end result

**.

The topic of a bootable external USB Linux hard drive (without dual-boot) is an area that is not well documented. A simple Google search shows many articles, blogs and forum posts written on this topic, all of them discuss setting up dual-boot strategies. While I did not specifically test a USB Thumb Drive and did not intend to address this device in this article, I see no reason why this would not work for Thumb Drives as well. This article was written with the goal of defining an alternative to the traditional dual boot concept and keeping each operating system isolated from each other.

While the dual-boot scenario works, this can cause undesirable issues when grub installs its files on the external drive. Should Grub install its files to the external drive, the drive must be connected before booting the computer or you will receive a Grub 17or 21 error. Based on the testing I have done in an effort to achieve the desired results, I did not want a dual-boot on either the laptops operating system (internal hard drive) or on the external USB drive.

This document applies to all Linux distributions that I have tried since writing the original document in 2008. You will want to use laptop or desktop hardware in which the BIOS supports booting to a USB device.

Why would you want to do this?

Small foot print USB powered external drives are very obtainable and affordable. These drives come in various sizes with the most common and cost effective today being 250GB. This gives you the ability to:

Test new OS versions
Carry multiple working OS’s with you in the field
Lab issues in the field
Test patches
Perform demonstrations

All of the above and more without risking the OS installed in your laptop or desktop. While this solution may not be right for everyone; this will provide you with more options.

There are several ways to achieve the results described herein; I will describe two of these methods and you can choose which method works better for your scenario.

Method 1:

Insert the Linux OS Install CD/DVD
Reboot the computer
Enter the “Setup Menu”
Disable the internal hard drive
Save settings and exit
The computer will reboot so you can see the Post Screen
Push the appropriate key (F12 for Dell Laptops) to bring up the “One Time Boot Menu”
Select boot from CD/DVD
Install Linux OS (Follow your normal install procedure)
The only device that should appear is the external USB drive

Note: Since the internal hard drive is disabled the Linux OS will have no choice, it will install all of the required components for the external USB drive to become a bootable device.

When the install has completed:

Remove the Linux OS Install CD/DVD
Reboot the computer
Enter the “Setup Menu”
Enable the internal hard drive
Change the boot order to resemble
    USB Device
    Internal Hard drive
    CD/DVD
Save settings and exit
The computer will reboot so you can see the Post Screen (Let the system boot as normal)

The machine will boot into your newly installed Linux OS and will have no knowledge or connection to the OS that is installed on the computers internal hard drive.

Method 2:

Insert the Linux OS Install CD/DVD
Shout down the computer
Remove the internal hard drive
Start the computer
The computer will boot so you can see the Post Screen
Push the appropriate key (F12 for Dell Laptops) to bring up the “One Time Boot Menu”
Select boot from CD/DVD
Install Linux OS (Follow your normal install procedure)
The only device that should appear is the external USB drive

Note: Since the internal hard drive was physically removed the Linux OS will have no choice, it will install all of the required components for the external USB drive to become a bootable device.

When the install has completed:

Remove the Linux OS Install CD/DVD
Shut down the computer
Install internal hard drive
Enter the “Setup Menu”
Change the boot order to resemble
    USB Device
    Internal Hard drive
    CD/DVD
Save settings and exit
The computer will reboot so you can see the Post Screen (Let the system boot as normal)

The machine will boot into your newly installed Linux OS and will have no knowledge or connection to the OS that is installed on the computers internal hard drive.

Issue:

During one of my tests, after all of the above steps were completed Linux on the USB External Hard drive would not boot. The computer did not see the device as a bootable device therefore the machine booted to the OS installed on the internal hard drive.

Solution:

Plug the external USB device into the USB port on the computer
Place the Linux install CD/DVD in the CD/DVD drive on the computer
The computer will boot so you can see the Post Screen
Push the appropriate key (F12 for Dell Laptops) to bring up the “One Time Boot Menu”
Select boot from CD/DVD
The main install screen will give you the option to repair the Installed OS (during my tests this did not have any unwanted effects on the computers internal hard drive or the OS installed on it)
Once the repair is completed remove the CD/DVD from the CD/DVD drive
Reboot the computer

The computer should boot to the OS installed on the external USB drive without issue. However you need to understand the BIOS in your machine; I would suggest removing any USB devices except for the hard drive before booting the computer.

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I don't think this addresses the OP's question re: upgrading distributions via LiveUSB. –  amc Sep 23 '13 at 5:06
    
Unfortunately it was not clear as to what type of USB he was referring to in his post. However the information is valid for a USB hard drive which is a much better way than using a usb stick! Just a heads up...you can still use this method with a USB stick as long as your computer supports boot to USB. So in a way... it does answer the question. –  Rick Dunn Sep 23 '13 at 18:00
    
Rick Dunn Is there problem when I was upgrading ubuntu 12.10 to 13.04 alongside Windows 7? Because, I was not try it yet, I am too panic, that will affect to other system.. –  Andrias Meisyal Sep 24 '13 at 4:50
    
@RickDunn it doesn't answer the question though. OP asked "How do I upgrade Ubuntu 12.10 to Ubuntu 13.04 using a bootable USB?". In other words, instead of doing a sudo do-release-upgrade he wants to upgrade using the LiveUSB. As far as I can tell, this has nothing to do with installing Ubuntu on an external hard drive. –  amc Sep 24 '13 at 6:38
    
@amc thanks, for the clarification. OK, if there is nothing to do using this option as I was aks. How can I replace? I can not use the internet connection, speed is the problem.. –  Andrias Meisyal Sep 24 '13 at 23:58
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