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So what happened is I was creating a partition on my HDD (main one, no external ones) that could be accessed from both Windows and Ubuntu, one I could store files I would use on both in. I had empty space on the Windows partition so I shrunk that to the minimum and then created a partition with what was empty. That went off without a hitch. Now, when I try to mount my Windows partition, this is what I get:

Error mounting /dev/sda1 at /media/ubuntu/Toshiba Satellite A105 S4304:
Command-line `mount -t "ntfs" -o "uhelper=udisks2,nodev,nosuid,uid=999,gid=999,dmask=0077,fmask=0177" "/dev/
sda1" "/media/ubuntu/Toshiba Satellite A105 S4304"' exited with non-zero exit
status 13: Failed to load runlist for $MFT/$DATA.
highest_vcn = 0x7894, last_vcn - 1 = 0x78ef
Failed to load $MFT: Input/output error
Failed to mount '/dev/sda1': Input/output error
NTFS is either inconsistent, or there is a hardware fault, or it's a
SoftRAID/FakeRAID hardware. In the first case run chkdsk /f on Windows
then reboot into Windows twice. The usage of the /f parameter is very
important! If the device is a SoftRAID/FakeRAID then first activate
it and mount a different device under the /dev/mapper/ directory, (e.g.
/dev/mapper/nvidia_eahaabcc1). Please see the 'dmraid' documentation 
for more details. 

I looked around and found I should try running this command : sudo ntfsfix /dev/sda1 but I got this:

Mounting volume... Failed to load runlist for $MFT/$DATA.
highest_vcn = 0x7894, last_vcn - 1 = 0x78ef
Failed to load $MFT: Input/output error
FAILED
Attempting to correct errors... Failed to load runlist for $MFT/$DATA.
highest_vcn = 0x7894, last_vcn - 1 = 0x78ef
Failed to load $MFT: Input/output error
FAILED
Failed to startup volume: Input/output error
Checking for self-located MFT segment... OK
Failed to load runlist for $MFT/$DATA.
highest_vcn = 0x7894, last_vcn - 1 = 0x78ef
Failed to load $MFT: Input/output error
Volume is corrupt. You should run chkdsk.

EDIT: 9/2/2013 Adding sudo fdisk -l info:

Disk /dev/sda: 100.0 GB, 100030242816 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 12161 cylinders, total 195371568 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x5f425f42

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *          63    54028287    27014112+   7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda2        54028288   117415935    31693824    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda3       117417982   195371007    38976513    5  Extended
/dev/sda5       193296384   195371007     1037312   82  Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda6       117417984   193296383    37939200   83  Linux

Partition table entries are not in disk order

What should I do? I don't want to shut down in case it will cause problems. I know that moving partitions can cause problems (accidently deleted GRUB once by simply re-formatting the Ubuntu partition...oops :P), but I didn't think this would. I have the Windows XP disk somewhere, but I'm not totally sure where, I could try and find it. Should I use Rescatux?

Help!

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marked as duplicate by Braiam, Thomas W., Alaa Ali, RolandiXor Sep 2 '13 at 17:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I fixed it. I found my XP Pro disks and ran chkdsk /r (didn't have option /f and /r did the same thing & more). Windows booted and I was able to back up my files. Thanks for all the help! –  RPi Awesomeness Sep 14 '13 at 13:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Resizing partitions and moving partitions pose similar risks. What's more, if you truly resized the partition to its minimum size (that is, so that you had 0 free space), you might have created complications, since there's little room for fixing problems on a 100% full partition.

That said, Linux has no good NTFS repair utilities. (The ntfsfix program just does a few very minimal things and then flags the filesystem for further checks and repair in Windows.) To fix an NTFS problem, you really must use Windows on it.

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Thank you for answering, this really had me worried. So I should 1: Add some space to the Windows partition and 2 boot into windows and run chkdsk? –  RPi Awesomeness Aug 31 '13 at 17:22
    
I'd fix the filesystem in Windows before attempting to resize it. –  Rod Smith Aug 31 '13 at 17:43
    
So, just shut down start up windows and run chkdsk? –  RPi Awesomeness Aug 31 '13 at 17:45

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