Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Using Ubuntu 12.04 64 bit, I had the Ubuntu 12.04 on one of my two original 320 Gb HD, and a plethora of old backup files on the other. A few years ago, I added a 1 Tb HD and have been saving my recent backups to it using Back in Time.

As of yesterday, the 1 Tb HD does not appear in devices. I checked the power and data plugs to this drive and they appear normal. Could the drive have suddenly gone dead or is there something else that I should check?

Disk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders, total 1953525168 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x0002be96

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 * 2048 1949333503 974665728 83 Linux /dev/sda2 1949335550 1953523711 2094081 5 Extended /dev/sda5 1949335552 1953523711 2094080 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Disk /dev/sdb: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders, total 625142448 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x0002e221

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sdb1 * 63 353703104 176851521 83 Linux /dev/sdb3 353703934 625137344 135716705+ 5 Extended /dev/sdb5 614020428 625137344 5558458+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris /dev/sdb6 353703936 609830911 128063488 83 Linux /dev/sdb7 609832960 614019071 2093056 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Partition table entries are not in disk order

Disk /dev/mapper/cryptswap1: 2144 MB, 2144337920 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 260 cylinders, total 4188160 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x0f1d0188

Disk /dev/mapper/cryptswap1 doesn't contain a valid partition table brooks@brooks-System-Product-Name:~$ Disk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders, total 1953525168 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x0002be96

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 * 2048 1949333503 974665728 83 Linux /dev/sda2 1949335550 1953523711 2094081 5 Extended /dev/sda5 1949335552 1953523711 2094080 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Disk /dev/sdb: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders, total 625142448 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x0002e221

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sdb1 * 63 353703104 176851521 83 Linux /dev/sdb3 353703934 625137344 135716705+ 5 Extended /dev/sdb5 614020428 625137344 5558458+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris /dev/sdb6 353703936 609830911 128063488 83 Linux /dev/sdb7 609832960 614019071 2093056 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Partition table entries are not in disk order

Disk /dev/mapper/cryptswap1: 2144 MB, 2144337920 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 260 cylinders, total 4188160 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x0f1d0188

Disk /dev/mapper/cryptswap1 doesn't contain a valid partition table brooks@brooks-System-Product-Name:~$ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 931.5G 0 disk
├─sda1 8:1 0 929.5G 0 part / ├─sda2 8:2 0 1K 0 part
└─sda5 8:5 0 2G 0 part
└─cryptswap1 (dm-0) 252:0 0 2G 0 crypt [SWAP] sdb 8:16 0 298.1G 0 disk
├─sdb1 8:17 0 168.7G 0 part
├─sdb3 8:19 0 1K 0 part
├─sdb5 8:21 0 5.3G 0 part
├─sdb6 8:22 0 122.1G 0 part
└─sdb7 8:23 0 2G 0 part
sr0 11:0 1 1024M 0 rom
sr1 11:1 1 1024M 0 rom
brooks@brooks-System-Product-Name:~$

share|improve this question
    
Edit your question and include sudo fdisk -l, lsblk. Also dmesg. –  Braiam Aug 17 '13 at 1:47

1 Answer 1

It's possible that it died. Sometimes, to help restore your data you could get lucky by placing the HDD in a ziplock back, and leaving it in the freezer for 2-4 hours, and if your lucky, the HDD will live for a few more hours, hopefully, providing you with enough time to recover a decent amount of data

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.