Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm currently using a live CD and I am attempting to delete everything off of my harddrive. So, I've used the command sudo nautilus and attempted to delete everything off of my SSD. However, I cannot delete the folder rofs (Read only file system). I generally would have absolutely no issues with this, however, I believe it is causing everything I delete to come back to life upon restarting the computer.

Prior to using Nautilus to do this, I've used sudo shred -vz -n 1 /dev/sda2, and dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda2 but it doesn't seem to work. The grub loader still exists, I wish to demolish it, and preferably all other files.

How can I remove the grub loader, and if possible, how can I delete the rofs folder entirely?

share|improve this question
    
Please provide exact commands you used. –  Danatela Jul 22 '13 at 4:43
    
Ah, my only real goal is to delete the grub loader from my harddrive. Do you know how I'd actually go about doing that? As err, explained in the OP :c But, "sudo shred -vz -n 1 /dev/sda2" And "dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda2" And most recently, to launch Nautilus, "sudo nautilus" –  Kevin Jul 22 '13 at 4:51
    
And where is your GRUB installed? Also, do you mount namely /dev/sda2 after cleaning? Do you have any other partitions on this SSD? –  Danatela Jul 22 '13 at 4:57
    
The Grub Loader is in /boot/grub, but deleting this does nothing as it seems to actually be located in the /rofs/boot/grub May I ask what you mean by the mounting question? No, no partitions. Just Unallocated Space. –  Kevin Jul 22 '13 at 5:03
    
Try to execute dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda. Mounting is the operation that precedes viewing disk contents. –  Danatela Jul 22 '13 at 5:09

2 Answers 2

IF your trying to delete everything, why not use

$sudo gparted

to simply reformat? That would get rid of everything... period.

Also ROFS might refer to the medium that the live distro is written/burned/saved on (I could be wrong).

share|improve this answer

Maybe your grub resides on MBR, and by dd-ing all of /dev/sda2 you just get ride of your data, files and folders, not your boot loader.

On the other hand, If you loose your boot loader, you can't boot up with that disk at all. So, after deleting the content, use

sudo fdisk /dev/sda

To remove that partition and write changes to table. When that partition (dev/sda2) is completely gone and shown as free space, you're done. (still you can low-level format to make sure recovering is almost impossible.)

Low-level formatting is a procedure where you write data directly to the storage medium, bypassing the filesystem layer.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.