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The last two times I have updated from the Software Updater, I have had to reinstall my graphics drivers and restart Unity.

The first time it happened it took quite a long time for me to find out how to get everything back. I am unfamiliar with Ubuntu and unity and I'm wondering why I had to do this. Should I turn off Updates all together? Are there specific updates that I should avoid?

For complete reference. I will put what I did below to get everything back up and running. I don't know if all of it is necessary, but I know it gets me back to where I was if I do it this way:

1) The machine comes up with nothing but a bad resolution and a mouse pointer. So I kill the xserver by "ctrl + alt + F1"

2) I do the following so I can install the nvidia drivers again

  • sudo service lightdm stop

  • sudo sh NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-319.23.run

3) I go through nvidia's rigamarole and reinstall everything

4) I restart and the resolution is clearly where it should be but I'm still missing Unity so I followed some instructions I found on this site

5) The terminal I used to do step 4 obviously disappears but the unity bar never comes back up

6) That step 4 must do something funky to the metacity stuff cause I lose control over my terminal boxes so I run metacity and get them back

7) I restart my machine and everything is "near" back to normal (I lose all of my icons that I previously had on the launcher and gain some that I long ago got rid of)

So my main concern here is I don't want to do this every time the Software Updater has an update. Is this a common problem?

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Can you add to your question why you're installing the nvidia drivers by hand? This is a result of installing the nvidia drivers by hand instead of what comes packaged in the distro. –  Jorge Castro Jul 14 '13 at 18:06
    
Please don't use the Nvidia .run file for this. Everytime you install a new kernel you'll have to rebuild it for the new kernel. Use packages! –  gertvdijk Jul 14 '13 at 18:08
    
Well to be quite honest, I don't remember the "exact" reason but I can tell you what comes standard did not support anything other than a really low resolution. Also, I have been messing around with Steam for linux and I need to have actual nvidia drivers rather than the standard on ubuntu. –  Brett Jul 14 '13 at 18:09
    
If there is a better way to install nvidia drivers, could you please send me a link to where that is? I'm open to suggestions here :D –  Brett Jul 14 '13 at 18:11
    
Ah, well, so if you really need the 319.x drivers or up you don't have so much options. Only to install the xorg-edgers PPA with experimental quality packages... askubuntu.com/a/289680/88802 (without the bumblebee instructions if you don't have hybrid graphics) –  gertvdijk Jul 14 '13 at 18:48
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1 Answer

You certainly can use the nVidia .run files, IF you have Dynamic Kernel Module Support, dkms, installed before you start. It will make the driver rebuildable for a kernel upgrade.

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