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I already have a Ext4 partition on my hard drive. During Ubuntu's installation the setup shows me an option to split a partition. Apparently I am being forced to define a new partition, but I just want it to install Ubuntu in my already existing Ext4 partition. How do I do this?

Edit: I've taken a picture of my advanced installation screen. sda1 is where my Windows installation is, sda5 and sda6 are the linux partitions I already have. sda7 is my data partition. I'd like to install Ubuntu in sda6, without messing up my windows installation or the data in sda7. What do I have to do?

Installation screen

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Choose manual install instead of automatic side by side. –  psusi Jul 13 '13 at 2:17
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How to install Ubuntu an existing partition, that has content on it:

  1. When presented with formatting choices screen choose "Something Else", and click continue
  2. Select the partition you want to install to. (eg. Sda6)
  3. Click "Change"
  4. Click the "Use As" menu, and scroll to find the file system you wish to use. (eg. Ext4)
  5. Check the "Format" box
  6. Choose a mount point (eg. /), and click okay
  7. Make sure boot loader is going to install to the correct drive. (eg. Sda)
  8. Click "Install Now", and proceed with installation setup

Please Note, this will erase all data on the selected partition. Alternatively you can choose not to format in which case directories and files that are on the partition will only be over-written if they use the same names as files and folders written by the ubuntu installer, though if you do this you must choose to use the filesystem as what-ever it is currently formatted as.

Sincerely, tapthoseshoesandwish

Sources: http://candlelight.any.djun.net/x/1/index.php?topic=520.0

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On the dropdown for the device where the bootloader is to be installed, do I leave it as it is? I'd like to still be able to boot Windows. –  David McDavidson Jul 15 '13 at 11:15
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Reposted to this answer your comment, since I'm not registered I can't repsond via comments.

How to install Ubuntu an existing partition, that has content on it:

  1. When presented with formatting choices screen choose "Something Else", and click continue
  2. Select the partition you want to install to. (eg. Sda6)
  3. Click "Change"
  4. Click the "Use As" menu, and scroll to find the file system you wish to use. (eg. Ext4)
  5. Check the "Format" box
  6. Choose a mount point (eg. /), and click okay
  7. Make sure boot loader is going to install to the correct drive. (eg. Sda)
  8. Click "Install Now", and proceed with installation setup

Please Note, this will erase all data on the selected partition. Alternatively you can choose not to format in which case directories and files that are on the partition will only be over-written if they use the same names as files and folders written by the ubuntu installer, though if you do this you must choose to use the filesystem as what-ever it is currently formatted as.

REPLY TO YOUR COMMENT: Please Note, If you install the bootloader to your hard drive (eg sda), and you have Windows setup to boot from that drive, Ubuntu's bootloader (grub2) will overwrite the Windows bootloader. The Ubuntu bootloader will automatically add an entry for your Ubuntu install, as well as an entry for you Windows install, allowing you to boot both Ubuntu and Windows, however if you decide to ditch Ubuntu down the road, you will have to keep the Ubuntu boot loader (grub2) in order to boot Windows. Installing grub in this manner is standard, but not the only option.

Sincerely, tapthoseshoesandwish

Sources: http://candlelight.any.djun.net/x/1/index.php?topic=520.0

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