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I've seen several posts suggesting using nmcli, nm-tool and similarly named utilities for network related tasks. In my case, I was trying to see what DNS my Ubuntu server installation is trying to use since my DNS lookup started failing after switching to static ip.

Here are some of the posts that mention these tools:

All of these assume that the nm tools are available on all systems, yet they're not on mine. Apparently they are part of NetworkManager. I haven't found network management on my server particularly difficult out of the box, but perhaps I'm missing something. Should I install NetworkManager?

Here's my Ubuntu server version information:

$ lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Ubuntu
Description:    Ubuntu 12.10
Release:    12.10
Codename:   quantal
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If network-manager is not available you're probably not running stock Ubuntu. Afaik, it is a default install. You don't have to install it if you fix your dnsmasq configuration. –  hbdgaf Jul 7 '13 at 13:50
    
I'd try to avoid network manager if possible. If you are not using dnsmasq, the DNS servers are configured in /etc/resolv.conf - since you use static IP, I'd try to simply set them in that file and hope that it isn't overwritten on reboot... If it is overwritten I'd check if dnsmasq is being run at boot, and if it is, disable it. –  soulsource Jul 7 '13 at 13:54
    
@call me V: Networkmanager is pulled in, if you install gnome. It is not part of Ubuntu Server edition. –  soulsource Jul 7 '13 at 13:55
    
Don't disable dnsmasq, just learn to use it. It builds the configuration it uses to overwrite with several config files. Just use it properly instead of fighting with it. wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Dnsmasq –  hbdgaf Jul 7 '13 at 13:57
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Thanks for all the discussion. As to my DNS issue, it turned out that I simply had to add dns-nameservers to my /etc/network/interfaces file. –  Codie CodeMonkey Jul 7 '13 at 16:39
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