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I'm confused that which version should install, 12.04 LTS or 13.04? What i'm missing in 12.04?

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marked as duplicate by Luis Jul 24 '13 at 0:34

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Whatever you want... and you are not missing out on anything in 13.04 since both are updated in case of bugs. –  Rinzwind Jul 2 '13 at 16:48
    
See What's the difference between a Long Term Support Release and a Normal Release? on the different releases. –  lgarzo Jul 2 '13 at 17:09

2 Answers 2

From the desktop download page:

Ubuntu 12.04.2 LTS is a long-term support release. It has continuous hardware support improvements as well as guaranteed security and support updates until April 2017.

Ubuntu 13.04 will be supported for 9 months and includes cutting-edge new features that make your music, videos, documents and apps much easier to access.

You might choose 12.04 if you need stability and don't want to worry about upgrading or reinstalling your OS after a short period of time. Note that releases between the LTS versions are now only supported for 9 months, while the LTS versions are supported for 5 years..

On the other hand, you might choose 13.04 is you are interested in trying out the latest features and the newest apps. The releases between the LTS versions are now seen as a way to get new features and apps out there for testing and bug reporting.

13.04 brings changes to the look, interaction with and management of online accounts, workspaces, and the Dash lenses. See new features in 13.04 at OMGUbuntu.

A note on upgrading thanks to lgarzo:

When it is time to upgrade, your upgrade paths will vary by which version you choose.

LTS-versions come out every 2 years and are designed to upgrade to the next LTS-version. So with an LTS, you can upgrade to a cutting-edge system every 2 years, while maintaining stability.

Non-LTS releases upgrade to the next available release, so in general you can stay more up-to-date, but you may have less stability.

Finally, an LTS-version can also be upgraded to the next non-LTS, but doing this will convert the upgrade path to the same as a non-LTS.

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I'd add this about upgrading: If you plan a bit further, your upgrade paths vary by which version you choose. LTS is designed to upgrade to the next LTS, thus you'll get a „cutting-edge” system in every 2 years. Non-LTS releases upgrade to the next available release, so it might be usually more up-to-date. (Finally LTS can be upgraded to the next non-LTS, but that will convert the upgrade path to the same as a non-LTS.) –  lgarzo Jul 2 '13 at 17:07
    
@lgarzo Thanks. Added the info. –  chaskes Jul 2 '13 at 17:16

if you want everything to be the newest you shall choose the 13.04 but there shall be a new version available soon and you might have to upgrade to it. So if you want to get familiar with ubuntu better start with 12.04 LTS which will be supported with updates for longer period.

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