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I am trying to install Ubuntu 12 on a first generation eee PC that has two itty bitty solid state drives. (One drive is 8GB and one is 4.5GB. And that's ALL I have to work with, too!)

I already successfully installed on the 4.5GB drive, but after one use, there wasn't even enough disk space to save a file. Also, the 8GB drive doesn't seem to be able to hold files at all, and isn't visible from the main Ubuntu interface, anyways.

What I need to do is simply blank out the installation on the 4.5GB drive, and put a new installation on the 8GB drive. I don't honestly care about having a whole lot of extra disk space on this computer, since it's a netbook and a work computer. If I can get the installation to go, and the 4GB drive emptied out, I'll be happy to use that 4GB drive for the files that come from a days' work, to be emptied out each night.

I can follow instructions, but I am sadly lacking on the understanding on how I would go about partitioning my drives, or telling Ubuntu to install on the 8GB drive, or even the terminology I would need to search online for instructions on how to do this. Apparently, my problem has something to do with partitioning the drives?

Help! All I get is errors when I try to use the tool provided in setup, and I know it's likely my fault for not understanding something essential.

What I need are detailed, step-by-step instructions to get the OS on the drive I want it on, not on the smaller drive that is apparently automatically selected when I go to install Ubuntu...

What do I do?

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You want to use LVM to join the two drives. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 1 '13 at 5:54
    
How do I use it? Where do I find LVM? What is it? –  Pearl Jul 1 '13 at 6:12
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