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Why is that? When I was running Windows XP on my computer, I had 1,5 GB of RAM. I have two questions:

  • Why is that?
  • Can I get my 1,5 GB of RAM or Ubuntu considers that 1,5 GB on Windows is 500 MB in Linux?

I do not think this is normal because I can't do anything except running one app at the time.

Help please!

I have entered the command :

sudo dmidecode -t memory

And it gives me a lot of information. I can see this :

    # dmidecode 2.11
    SMBIOS version fixup (2.31 -> 2.3).
    SMBIOS 2.3 present.

    Handle 0x0005, DMI type 5, 20 bytes
    Memory Controller Information
    Error Detecting Method: None
    Error Correcting Capabilities:
            None
    Supported Interleave: One-way Interleave
    Current Interleave: One-way Interleave
    Maximum Memory Module Size: 1024 MB
    Maximum Total Memory Size: 2048 MB
    Supported Speeds:
            60 ns
    Supported Memory Types:
            DIMM
    Memory Module Voltage: 3.3 V
    Associated Memory Slots: 2
            0x0006
            0x0007
    Enabled Error Correcting Capabilities:
            None

    Handle 0x0006, DMI type 6, 12 bytes
    Memory Module Information
    Socket Designation: DIMM 1
    Bank Connections: 0 1
    Current Speed: 75 ns
    Type: DIMM SDRAM
    Installed Size: 256 MB (Double-bank Connection)
    Enabled Size: 256 MB (Double-bank Connection)
    Error Status: OK

    Handle 0x0007, DMI type 6, 12 bytes                                                                                                            
    Memory Module  

    Information                                                                                                                      
    Socket Designation: DIMM 2                                                                                                             
    Bank Connections: 2 3
    Current Speed: 75 ns
    Type: DIMM SDRAM
    Installed Size: 256 MB (Double-bank Connection)
    Enabled Size: 256 MB (Double-bank Connection)
    Error Status: OK

    Handle 0x0010, DMI type 16, 15 bytes
    Physical Memory Array
    Location: System Board Or Motherboard
    Use: System Memory
    Error Correction Type: None
    Maximum Capacity: 3 GB
    Error Information Handle: Not Provided
    Number Of Devices: 2

    Handle 0x0011, DMI type 17, 27 bytes
    Memory Device
    Array Handle: 0x0010
    Error Information Handle: No Error
    Total Width: 64 bits
    Data Width: 64 bits
    Size: 256 MB
    Form Factor: DIMM
    Set: 1
    Locator: DIMM 0
    Bank Locator: Bank 0, 1
    Type: SRAM
    Type Detail: Synchronous
    Speed: 333 MHz
    Manufacturer: Not Specified
    Serial Number: Not Specified
    Asset Tag: Not Specified
    Part Number: Not Specified

    Handle 0x0012, DMI type 17, 27 bytes
    Memory Device
    Array Handle: 0x0010
    Error Information Handle: No Error
    Total Width: 64 bits
    Data Width: 64 bits
    Size: 256 MB
    Form Factor: DIMM
    Set: 1
    Locator: DIMM 1
    Bank Locator: Bank 2, 3
    Type: SRAM
    Type Detail: Synchronous
    Speed: 333 MHz
    Manufacturer: Not Specified
    Serial Number: Not Specified
    Asset Tag: Not Specified
    Part Number: Not Specified

Now, I am totally confused.

share|improve this question
    
Welcome to Ask Ubuntu! That seems very unlikely to me, and no, this should not happen. Where are you reading the amount of memory is installed? Are you using some utility in Ubuntu to check it? Please provide the output of free -m run from a terminal. Edit your question to include all the requested information. –  gertvdijk Jun 26 '13 at 17:20
    
Thank you for your answer! I am going to check this right now. –  The Drummer from Kubuntu Jun 26 '13 at 17:30
    
I wrote free-m, and it just tells me that I have 462 MB of memory (random access memory I guess). I do not know what to do. –  The Drummer from Kubuntu Jun 26 '13 at 17:34
    
I've posted a comment, not an answer. ;) While you're at it, please run sudo dmidecode -t memory to see what memory is installed and recognized. It'll be a long list of output, so consider posting this on paste.ubuntu.com and leaving a link in your question. Please provide the exact and complete output. You may interpreting it differently, that's why. :) And again: edit edit EDIT –  gertvdijk Jun 26 '13 at 17:34
    
All evidence you posted seem to indicate indeed only 512 MB of memory is installed in this machine. Are you sure you have seen it correctly in Windows? Perhaps you accidentally had a look at the virtual memory size there (including pagefile/swap). Final thing to check: open the machine and check the memory. Open the BIOS configuration and check what it says there. –  gertvdijk Jun 26 '13 at 23:10

2 Answers 2

You don't have 1,5GB of memory.

First of all, nothing you have posted in your question indicates that you have 1,5 GB of memory installed. Instead, it is very consistent about the 2x 256 MB of memory being installed.

When I was too much applications, it was telling me that I had 1,49 GB used (and then it shot down).

Your statement about "seeing" 1,5 GB of memory being in use in Windows was probably about the virtual memory in use. This includes the memory on disk (pagefile, or in Linux-terms: swap).

By default you'll see most OS installers create a swap area of twice the amount of the physical RAM. In your Ubuntu installation you'll also see a swap line:

             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:           365        360          5          0         59         97
-/+ buffers/cache:        203        161
Swap:          767         13        754

In the output shown above the total available memory is 1022MB, the total physical memory installed is 365MB.

In Windows XP the task manager is showing an even more confusing view:

The "PF Usage" data is the amount of pagefile (swap) in use - it has nothing to do with the physical memory installed. As you can see, the numbers below do not represent the amount shown (334 MB).

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
  1. Click Dash.
  2. Type "System monitor"
  3. Click on the system monitor.
  4. In the system monitor window, select "Resources" tab.
  5. Check "Memory and swap history" graph you can find how much total RAM memory and how much Memory currently free.
share|improve this answer
1  
How does this answer the question? This is a way to check how much memory the kernel has available and recognized, but that's not what OP is asking for. –  gertvdijk Jun 26 '13 at 17:37
    
Yes, this is exacly what I am doing on Kubuntu, and what I did on Ubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntua and Debian, and I just gives me the same result: 462 MB. –  The Drummer from Kubuntu Jun 26 '13 at 17:48

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