Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I upgraded software couple days ago. Now I have a problem with my desktop. I'm attaching a print screen to show what I mean.

enter image description here
Click on the image to open a full-resolution version.

share|improve this question
1  
Interesting effect! Can you tell us what graphics card you use and the system set-up (PC/MAC) to help people work out what your problem could be. –  SimplySimon Jun 4 '13 at 13:40
    
I forgot to add that I have had this effect after closing the windows. I have Nvidia GeForce GT 325M and Intel HD - Asus N61JV. I hasn't install any drivers to them yet. –  Froopy Jun 4 '13 at 14:28
    
I'll reply in a few minutes, a bit busy at the moment sorting out my wife's email account –  SimplySimon Jun 4 '13 at 15:22

1 Answer 1

Solution 1

OK, this could be your answer,

After logging in to Ubuntu, Click on the System Settings icon on the Launch Bar and Click on the Software and Updates icon.

enter image description here

Wait for that window to appear, it will look something like this:

enter image description here

Select the latest driver that you want to use. as you can see I chose the 313-updates (proprietary) driver, whilst yours is probably set to Using X.Org X server - Nouveau display driver. Click on the Apply Changes button and wait for the drivers to be installed or activated, then click close.

Next, start Terminal with Ctrl+Alt+T and type in the following command:

sudo apt-get install nvidia-settings-313-updates

When that completes, enter the following command:

nvidia-settings

This will bring up the NVIDIA settings tool

Hope this helps.

Solution 2

I have found this solution which may help:

When you reboot your computer, as it is booting press esc to stop it for a while, and then press F6 to turn on nomodoset.

I have no idea what this does, bit has worked for some Asus machines

Solution 3

As this problem started after an update, you may have to do the following: (see here)

Regression bugs that freeze the system reliably are ironically the most productive to solve.

If you updated your system and it started to freeze, start reverting package updates backwards until the freezes stop occurring.

1). try is booting an earlier kernel. 
    a). Hold down the left shift key during boot, so that the grub bootloader 
        menu comes up. 
    b). Look through the set of available kernels for one you used prior to the update; 
    c). boot that and attempt to reproduce the freeze. 

If it does not freeze, then you now have a "Good" and "Bad" kernel and can proceed with a kernel bisection search to isolate what patch caused the failure.

(Yes, compiling kernels sounds intimidating and time consuming, but stick with it - the process is well documented and it has a very high likelihood of narrowing it to a specific cause!)

share|improve this answer
    
I followed your advice and I have now this kind of error i41.tinypic.com/iyitqf.jpg –  Froopy Jun 4 '13 at 20:54
    
Try the Proprietary, Tested Driver. –  SimplySimon Jun 4 '13 at 21:13
    
I tried and Ubuntu was suspending after I logged in. I had to uninstall it. –  Froopy Jun 4 '13 at 22:55
    
OK back to the drawing board. I'll try and find something else that will help. –  SimplySimon Jun 5 '13 at 4:49
    
I have added a second possible solution which may help to the bottom of my answer. –  SimplySimon Jun 5 '13 at 5:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.