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I recently installed 9.10 64-bit on a system that had 10.04 already installed. I thought I performed this installation correctly, but when I came to grub2 and chose the option I wanted, I got some errors.

First, I got the following message before the log in screen appeared:

The disk drive for /home is not ready yet or not present.

Continue to wait; or press S to skip mounting or M for manual recovery.

I rebooted and logged into the freshly installed 9.10 boot and this worked fine. I found the partition that 10.04 is on and created a user directory in /home that is a copy of the 9.10 /home. I named the user directory the same as it was previously, so there was no difference.

I then changed ownership and group of this newly created directory and then rebooted. I got the same error:

The disk drive for /home is not ready yet or not present.

Continue to wait; or press S to skip mounting or M for manual recovery.

but this time when I press S to skip, I was able to log in and see my desktop. The actions I did seemed to allow for log in but still the mounting of /home is not working as it should.

One thing I should mention. When installing 9.10 64-bit, I had some extra hard disk space available and I chose to format this to ext4 and then mount it to /home. This may be causing problems, but I thought when doing this it would mount to the /home for the new installation. It seemed to try to mount it on the old installation, though (the 10.04 one).

I hope this wasn't too confusing. Any help is much appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

EDIT - For the 9.10 installation /etc/fstab:

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid -o value -s UUID' to print the universally unique identifier
# for a device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name
# devices that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
proc            /proc           proc    nodev,noexec,nosuid 0       0

# / was on /dev/sda1 during installation
UUID=10270f21-1c42-494b-bd3f-813c23f6d518 /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1

# /home was on /dev/sda6 during installation
UUID=fc128610-a6d5-4d23-9898-064580419da0 /home           ext4    defaults        0       2

# swap was on /dev/sda5 during installation
UUID=d3644f61-b65c-4f30-9eb5-cda163f9fce5 none            swap    sw              0       0

For the 10.04 installation:

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid -o value -s UUID' to print the universally unique identifier
# for a device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name
# devices that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
proc            /proc           proc    defaults        0       0

# / was on /dev/sda6 during installation
UUID=28fd6eb0-38a2-4c22-86d8-f7dce7508ac4 /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1

# /home was on /dev/sda7 during installation
UUID=97f82eca-0fdd-49e1-a12b-b4e1f6adbcbb /home           ext4    defaults        0       2

# swap was on /dev/sda5 during installation
UUID=d3644f61-b65c-4f30-9eb5-cda163f9fce5 none            swap    sw              0       0

/dev/scd0       /media/cdrom0   udf,iso9660 user,noauto,exec,utf8 0       0

EDIT 2:

fdisk -l output:

Disk /dev/sda: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xcbcbcbcb

Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1        6231    50049483+  83  Linux
/dev/sda2            6232       30401   194145525    5  Extended
/dev/sda5           12158       12773     4939776   82  Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda6            6232       12157    47600532   83  Linux
/dev/sda7           12774       30401   141596878+  83  Linux

Partition table entries are not in disk order

blkid /dev/sda* output:

/dev/sda1: UUID="10270f21-1c42-494b-bd3f-813c23f6d518" TYPE="ext4" 
/dev/sda5: UUID="d3644f61-b65c-4f30-9eb5-cda163f9fce5" TYPE="swap" 
/dev/sda6: UUID="28fd6eb0-38a2-4c22-86d8-f7dce7508ac4" TYPE="ext4" 
/dev/sda7: UUID="97f82eca-0fdd-49e1-a12b-b4e1f6adbcbb" TYPE="ext4"
share|improve this question
    
Why not "double post"? We're different sites with mostly different people. If you're worried about there being two versions, bring the content over here and edit the old version to point to here. –  Oli Aug 24 '10 at 7:35
    
plus we all know that those superuser guys are stuck up! :P With their tv contests and stuff. –  myusuf3 Aug 24 '10 at 14:09
    
Wow - I like this site so far... –  nicorellius Aug 24 '10 at 15:16
    
sda1 is / on 9.10, sda6 is /home on it AND ALSO / on 10.04? and sda7 is /home on 10.04? How about you tell us which partitions you intended to have be /home on each of them? –  maco Aug 24 '10 at 16:28
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The home partition of your 9.10 install, uuuid finish in 19da0, doesn't seem to exist on your computer.

If you want to share your home partition in both OS, change it to the other uuuid in the 9.10 fstab.

But I don't believe that this is a great idea. Different version of every program are going to touch the same config files and sooner than later something will get funny.

You should probably repartition your disk to make space for another home. Assign it in 9.10. Mount the 10.04 home in another path and link the non-config files of the 9.10 install to it. Dirs like Documents, Music, etc...

If you don't want a separate home partition in 9.10 do as Maco told, just delete that line. Everything should be fine as now your home is probably on the f6d518 disk.

share|improve this answer
    
I installed GParted and opened it up. I noticed that the extended sda partition was somehow surrounding the sda 5, 6 and 7 partitions. I couldn't reformat it without interfering with the good partitions. –  nicorellius Aug 24 '10 at 18:59
1  
That's what an extended partition is supposed to do. It's a container for logical partitions. –  maco Aug 24 '10 at 19:25
    
Yah, I figured that out... I think since this laptop is an experimental machine for me (that's my goal is to learn with this machine), I will reinstall both installations after I create and reformat new partitions. Thanks for your help. –  nicorellius Aug 24 '10 at 20:09
    
If this machine is for experimental purposes only, I wouldn't bother too much with making separate /home partitions and just use 1 partition per install (Ubuntu version). –  JanC Aug 25 '10 at 2:27
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If you making a /home dir on the 10.04 means you don't intend for it to have a separate /home partition, then just delete

# /home was on /dev/sda7 during installation
UUID=97f82eca-0fdd-49e1-a12b-b4e1f6adbcbb /home           ext4    defaults        0       2

from its /etc/fstab

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this and the problem persisted. Since the 10.04 installation doesn't have much data and is relatively new, I may reinstall 10.04 on sda3 (new partition in place of sda7) and leave sda6 alone. Would this work? If so, could I then unmount the old 10.04 / so that only 9.10 /home remains on sda6? –  nicorellius Aug 24 '10 at 18:56
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