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I'm trying to open my SD memorycard, but it doesn't show up when plugged in. Though it is detected when I look at the USB-devices

lsusb

and then I get:

Bus 001 Device 002: ID 0ac8:c33e Z-Star Microelectronics Corp. 
Bus 002 Device 010: ID 058f:6335 Alcor Micro Corp. SD/MMC Card Reader
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 005 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 006 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 007 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 008 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

How do I open this now? Or how do I make it show up next time I insert the card?

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Are you asking on how to access your files from the terminal? As in, mounting the volume on the SD card and browse into the folders/files on it? – gertvdijk May 22 '13 at 15:08
    
Yes exactly this, I need to put some files on it – Xavier Hofman May 22 '13 at 15:09
1  
You should be able to use sudo fdisk -l to find out where your SD card is. Then you can use its file name to mount it as a device. sudo mkdir /mountLocation;sudo mount /dev/whatever /mountLocation. Is that what you're looking for? – Vreality May 22 '13 at 15:27
    
The thing is, when i use fdisk, it doesn't list it. – Xavier Hofman May 22 '13 at 17:25
    
Have you found the solution? – Bishal Paudel Aug 9 '15 at 7:00

The easiest GUI way to see this is to just run the Disks program and all mounted disks will show up. SD cards looked like /dev/mmcblk followed by a single integer, a p for partition, and another single integer for partition number.

If the SD card is not already setup in /etc/fstab, let's say your username is jim (like mine), it will mount under /mnt/jim/ where UUID is the unique disk identifier.

You don't need to be root or have sudo access to run blkid and look through the list to see what your SD card's UUID is, like this:

/dev/mmcblk0p2: UUID="2fa2f9f1-0c50-42e6-9e05-3cc5a3421c38" TYPE="ext2"
/dev/mmcblk0p3: UUID="83bcffea-4c41-4860-8965-970c5f3e90b4" TYPE="ext4"

To see whether it's actually mounted, use mount with no options, you'll get a listing like this:

/dev/mmcblk0p2 on /media/jim/2fa2f9f1-0c50-42e6-9e05-3cc5a3421c38 type ext2 (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=udisks2)

/dev/mmcblk0p3 on /media/jim/83bcffea-4c41-4860-8965-970c5f3e90b4 type ext4 (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=udisks2)

There is of course the chance that your SD card is not formatted in a way that Ubuntu can read it, if you have sudo access you can run gksudo gparted for a gui-based disk manager that's a little more powerful than Disks.

You say you need to put files ON the SD card so in theory you will want to format it if necessary.

The comment that suggests using the mount command may not auto-discover the file system type in which case you have to add -t filesystemtype, check this page for more than you ever wanted to know about file systems: Linux File Systems Explained

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BTW if you have a dual boot setup with Windows and grub, ignore gparted when it complains at startup, do not FIX anything unless you know what it's going to do! – JimLohse Feb 4 at 14:18

Ubuntu 13.10 onwards, the mount points are to be found in: /run/user/$UID/gvfs/

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