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I'm running 12.04.2 through regular updates. Installed 12.04.1. After 12.04.2 was released I made an upgrade of XServer & Linux kernel. So now I'm running Precise with Quantal kernel and XServer.

What I want to know is if there is a way to do a similar upgrade with the new version. I don't really want to upgrade my LTS version but I would like to improve it a little.

If there is a way please would you help me with key steps?

Thank you in advance.

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Are you sure you run Precise with Quantal kernel? I am not sure but it seems it is not safe. –  Jobin Apr 27 '13 at 7:46
    
I did upgrade to lts-quantal kernel. I just followed these commands: askubuntu.com/questions/257617/… So far it has been very safe, no issues at all –  Francisco J. Robles Apr 27 '13 at 13:53
    
As far as I can see there are new packages in the Precise sources: linux-image-generic-lts-raring linux-headers-generic-lts-raring If someone has already installed them and using day-to-day, please share your opinion. I'm especial interested in Dell E6430 on the Ivy Bridge platform. –  GrzesiekC May 8 '13 at 8:51
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The Raring kernel will be provided/backported at some point to 12.04. However testing and certification need to happen before this is available.

Since the kernel is usually a vital piece of a working system, unless you have a specific problem that a newer kernel will fix, you're probably better off waiting for it to come into 12.04 officially.

If you want to help testing that kernel and want to get your hands dirty, ping the ubuntu kernel team:

See also:

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Thank you! I guess the Raring kernel will be backported with the next point release, right? I think I will wait. I'm doing good with this one for the moment. Again, thanks –  Francisco J. Robles Apr 28 '13 at 2:50
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Ubuntu will be notifying you about the latest versions of the packages you have installed on your machine. If you want to do it manually,

sudo apt-get update

and then

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

Please read about the different options we can use with apt-get regarding update and upgrade

   update
       update is used to resynchronize the package index files from their sources. The indexes of available packages are fetched from the location(s) specified in
       /etc/apt/sources.list. For example, when using a Debian archive, this command retrieves and scans the Packages.gz files, so that information about new and
       updated packages is available. An update should always be performed before an upgrade or dist-upgrade. Please be aware that the overall progress meter will be
       incorrect as the size of the package files cannot be known in advance.

   upgrade
       upgrade is used to install the newest versions of all packages currently installed on the system from the sources enumerated in /etc/apt/sources.list. Packages
       currently installed with new versions available are retrieved and upgraded; under no circumstances are currently installed packages removed, or packages not
       already installed retrieved and installed. New versions of currently installed packages that cannot be upgraded without changing the install status of another
       package will be left at their current version. An update must be performed first so that apt-get knows that new versions of packages are available.

   dist-upgrade
       dist-upgrade in addition to performing the function of upgrade, also intelligently handles changing dependencies with new versions of packages; apt-get has a
       "smart" conflict resolution system, and it will attempt to upgrade the most important packages at the expense of less important ones if necessary. The
       dist-upgrade command may therefore remove some packages. The /etc/apt/sources.list file contains a list of locations from which to retrieve desired package
       files. See also apt_preferences(5) for a mechanism for overriding the general settings for individual packages.
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