Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just installed the proprietary fglrx-updates driver:

enter image description here

However, when I check the Graphics, it's shown to be VESA:WRESTLER:

enter image description here

What is this VESA:WRESTLER driver and why am I using it? Is it just another name for the fglrx-updates driver? Or is it a different thing?

share|improve this question
    
I think Wrestler is the codename for HD 6290, but the thing I don't understand is the VESA. When I Googled it, I found that VESA is a "Generic video driver". So is it the same as 'fglrx'? –  Chin Apr 13 '13 at 18:04
    
so do you also use the fglrx driver? And what does it show up on your Graphics page? –  Chin Apr 13 '13 at 18:12

1 Answer 1

Wrestler is a code name AMD/ATI gave to that model. I found this wikipedia article that has loads of names.

enter image description here

fxglr is a display driver so a piece of software to drive your videocard. So something different ;)

fglrx is the name of the Linux display driver used for ATI Radeon and ATI FireGL family of video adapters and stands for "FireGL and Radeon for X". It contains both free and open-source and proprietary parts. Starting from Catalyst 7.11, the ATI Proprietary Linux driver was renamed ATI Catalyst Linux.

So one (wrestler) is the name of a piece of hardware that the other one (fglrx) can use to use your display.

VESA is an organisation (Video Electronics Standards Association) and they define and create standards as their name implies.

share|improve this answer
    
my question specifically asks about VESA, what it means and the difference between it and the fglrx driver. You don't seem to address anything about VESA at all. Yes, I know VESA:WRESTLER is the name of the driver, it's shown in the image. And what I want to know is is it different from fglrx and how –  Chin Apr 13 '13 at 18:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.