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I've had trouble with installing on an external hard drive like I planned to, so I've decided it would be better just to set up a dual boot on my system. I've been searching to make sure I do it correctly, but I am running into some differences between my system and the ones being described and want to make sure it won't cause me any problems. I'm running a windows 8 that I had upgraded form 7, so it wouldn't be a secure boot if I'm correct on that since it wasn't preinstalled. Most of what I am coming across talks about using a preinstalled Windows 8 so I wanted to make sure this won't cause me any problems installing it as normal. The other problem I'm running into is everything I am finding talks about installing on a UEFI enabled system, and I'm running a legacy bios at the moment. Is that going to cause a problem? If so, is there a way I can make my machine a UEFI enabled system so that i don't run into these problems?

The computer I have is a Dell Inspiron N5040 laptop if that is needed, and if necessary I can give you whatever specs you may need.

If you need any more information from me on my machine or anything, just let me know

I've possible, I'd also like to know how I would go about removing Ubuntu if I decide I don't like it (though I doubt that would be the case) or if I for some reason can't get it to work. I've found some guides that require the original windows CD but I don't have that, and I've found some about using EasyBCD but from what I've seen it doesn't have a Windows 8 option.

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2 Answers

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I agree with Web-E answer, but here are some additional thoughts:

I'm running a legacy bios at the moment. Is that going to cause a problem? If so, is there a way I can make my machine a UEFI enabled system so that i don't run into these problems?

If Windows is installed in Legacy (non-UEFI) mode, then it will not cause any problem. It's even easier for Windows/Ubuntu dual-boot, because you will avoid all UEFI potential problems. So, do NOT try to change your partitioning to UEFI.

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Thanks @LovinBuntu. I just finished the install and I'm loving it already. It's all so simple to navigate. Thanks for your and Web-E's help and quick answers –  user147014 Apr 11 '13 at 8:47
    
you're welcome. Happy Ubuntu-ing :) –  LovinBuntu Apr 11 '13 at 20:48
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There won't be any problem.

Go ahead, create partition and install Ubuntu on that partition.

If you have hybrid graphics (intel + nvidia) you may need to install bumblebee. However latest nvidia driver beta now support optimus (not to full extent though).

For removing Ubuntu, yes you need to restore mbr. So Windows dvd will be best option.

Or you can use Boot-Repair or OS-uninstaller.

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Thank you for your quick response. It's good to know I won't have any problems if I just follow the instructions I've been finding. Since I don't have the windows dvd, which of the other options would you recommend more? –  user147014 Apr 11 '13 at 6:10
    
Both are from same developer. Os uninstaller is specific for that purpose. Be careful at portioning. Good luck. –  Web-E Apr 11 '13 at 6:14
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