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I need Ubuntu kernel v 3.8 to include support for AUFS feature.

I downloaded kernel from here

http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v3.8.3-raring/

  • linux-image-3.8.3-030803-generic_3.8.3-030803.201303141650_i386.deb
  • linux-headers-3.8.3-030803_3.8.3-030803.201303141650_all.deb

I installed them. command is:

$ sudo dpkg -i linux-*.deb

This is created /boot/vmlinuz-3.8.3-030803-generic and /boot/initrd.img-3.8.3-030803-generic AND /boot/initrd.img-3.8.3-030803-generic .

I execute following command:

$ grep AUFS boot/config-3.8.3-030803-generic 

I think this kernel image doesn't support AUFS feature, or does it?

I also want to know how to enable AUFS feature. Is a kernel rebuild required? Where do I get Ubuntu Kernel v.3.8's source code? I can't get apt command. This doesn't exist in precise's repository.

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If you have such specific needs -why- would you use a beta release? I would stick with 12.10 and at least wait for the actual 13.04 release. –  Rinzwind Apr 8 '13 at 7:35
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1 Answer 1

Probably not. I have not seen any reference to kernel 3.8 and AUFS. But then again it is a beta so it might arrive when the actual release is planned.

But it looks like AUFS is going to get deleted anyways. If it has not been deleted already.

Some links I found when searching ...


From this link:

In light of the concerns about overlayfs being sufficiently cooked in time for Precise, Andy Whitcroft and I have decided to re-enable aufs We will continue to advocate for dropping aufs in favor of a sufficient upstream solution at each development cycle. This means that aufs will disappear in future backported LTS kernels.

In other words, don't bet your business on aufs.

Conclusion: it did not work good enough in 12.04. It did work in 12.10 but it is doubtful it works in any future release.


From the links in this question:

How do I use OverlayFS?

Early in the Precise Pangolin 12.04 development cycle, we disabled support for AUFS in the kernel. This decision was made at UDS. The reasoning behind this decision included:

  * AUFS is not upstream.  Despite previous efforts from it's
    maintainer, it does not appear it will ever land upstream.
  * AUFS is a maintenance burden for the Ubuntu Kernel Team due to
    the fact that it is not upstream.
  * Support for OverlayFS has been available since Oneiric.  We have
    been encouraging migration to OverlayFS. The installer has
    already transitioned to using OverlayFS (which was done in
    Oneiric). 

Overlayfs

http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2012/08/introducing-overlayroot-overlayfs.html

Overlayfs is a successor of a series of union filesystem implementations, such as unionfs, aufs, etc. It creates a single unified view of two directories. One is the "lower" filesystem -- in our case, this a read-only mount of our original, pristine Ubuntu AMI. The second is the "upper" filesystem -- in our case, this is a read-write mount of an encrypted block device. We’re hopeful that it might one day make it upstream into Linux, though progress on that seems to have stalled. Thankfully, Ubuntu’s kernels are carrying it for now.


You should be focusing on overlayfs. See the accepted answer here: How do I use OverlayFS? on some documentation.

Good luck.

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Thank you answer Rinzwind(Is your icon "elfen lied" ?) But, Raring iso file cdimage.ubuntu.com/daily-live/current PC (Intel x86) desktop image is supported aufs. –  Kizuka Junki Apr 8 '13 at 8:08
    
Yes, it is from Elfen lied ;-) launchpad.net/ubuntu/raring/amd64/aufs-tools : Removal requested on 2013-01-02. There is far too many links on google when searching for 13.04 and aufs. Either is comes later or it has been nuked... I would try overlayfs ;) –  Rinzwind Apr 8 '13 at 8:11
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