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(ubuntu 12.10 on HP DV7 i5 with 8GB memory)

Yesterday I decided to delete my 522GB Win7 (NTFS) partition, and create my Ext4, since my exposure to my Win8 on another laptop had made me a 100% Ubuntu person.

This should have been simple. Use Gparted to Shrink the NTFS partition to nothing, create a new partition, format at Ext4 and that's it. After a manual mount it works fine.

Problem is that it will not automount. When rebooting I have to hit 'S' twice (not once!) then I can use GParted or Gigolo to mount it. (Files will not manually mount it).

In "Disks" Mount options are "nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show"

rock@rock-HP-Pavilion-dv7-Notebook-PC:~$ df -a
Filesystem     1K-blocks     Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda6      210902432 51481812 148707380  26% /
proc                   0        0         0    - /proc
sysfs                  0        0         0    - /sys
none                   0        0         0    - /sys/fs/fuse/connections
none                   0        0         0    - /sys/kernel/debug
none                   0        0         0    - /sys/kernel/security
udev             4053192       12   4053180   1% /dev
devpts                 0        0         0    - /dev/pts
tmpfs            1624960      992   1623968   1% /run
none                5120        0      5120   0% /run/lock
none             4062392      204   4062188   1% /run/shm
none              102400        0    102400   0% /run/user
gvfsd-fuse             0        0         0    - /home/rock/.gvfs
/dev/sdb1       62366716 10322668  52044048  17% /media/rock/64gbSD-ntfs
/dev/sda3      501769584   202592 476078508   1% /media/rock/Ddrive-ext4  <<== here

(sda3 is the problem partition, sda6 is Ubuntu : both are ext4)

What should I do now to make this new ext4 partition automount ?

Thanks! Rock. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Update ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Hi,

(Regarding "There is no way to convert between ntfs and ext4", yep figured that one out, gotta drop ntfs partitions and recreate an ext4 partition with free space.)

Just Did

I used gparted to drop all partitions except for "/dev/sda6" where ubuntu 12.10 is installed. Then I created an new ext4 partition "/dev/sda1" with all free space. Lastly cleaned up junk in fstab that caused my boot up warnings.

Now

Now files or gigolo mount "/dev/sda1" fine as I suppose a mount command line would.

(I am tempted to give up and use http://www.howtogeek.com/114503/how-to-resize-your-ubuntu-partitions to run livecd gparted off a USB boot and just use the whole 750MB disk "/dev/sda6" where ubuntu 12.10 is installed...)

Diagnostics

df -a
------

rock@rock-HP-Pavilion-dv7-Notebook-PC:/etc$ df -all
Filesystem     1K-blocks     Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda6      210902432 51493708 148695484  26% /   <<<==== Ubuntu 12.10
proc                   0        0         0    - /proc
sysfs                  0        0         0    - /sys
none                   0        0         0    - /sys/fs/fuse/connections
none                   0        0         0    - /sys/kernel/debug
none                   0        0         0    - /sys/kernel/security
udev             4053192        4   4053188   1% /dev
devpts                 0        0         0    - /dev/pts
tmpfs            1624960      980   1623980   1% /run
none                5120        0      5120   0% /run/lock
none             4062392      336   4062056   1% /run/shm
none              102400        0    102400   0% /run/user
gvfsd-fuse             0        0         0    - /home/rock/.gvfs
/dev/sda1      501971304   233224 476239408   1% /media/rock/DDrive-ext4 <<== Problem partition

fstab
-----
rock@rock-HP-Pavilion-dv7-Notebook-PC:/etc$ cat fstab
# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
# / was on /dev/sda6 during installation
UUID=42f2faf6-04cd-450f-8955-fc6ddbef1851 /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# swap was on /dev/sda5 during installation
UUID=0dd92898-6e7e-46bb-93eb-449a0f2b2df4 none            swap    sw              0       0
/dev/disk/by-uuid/1a4b1d29-6b8c-4404-b4ec-e61750d3da03 /mnt/1a4b1d29-6b8c-4404-b4ec-e61750d3da03 auto mountoptions=nosuid,nodev,nofail,noauto,x-gvfs-show 0 0

Thanks, Rock.

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3  
Show us /etc/fstab for /dev/sda3 (command grep sda3 /etc/fstab). –  Rinzwind Apr 2 '13 at 13:41
    
There is no way to convert between ntfs and ext4, afaik. –  mikewhatever Apr 2 '13 at 14:21
    
SOLVED using askubuntu.com/questions/232790/… Problem here is ubuntu 12.10 "disks" GUI app does not handle multiple ext4 partitions on same physical disks. So tedious manual editing of /etc/fstab was required. –  rockford cogar Apr 4 '13 at 17:31
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