Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way I can restrict the Internet connection and application use of another user account?

What I'd like to do is let that account connect for the use of Dropbox, but otherwise have no Internet access. Also, have a list of applications that the user can use, or better, a list that they cannot.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For the internet connection, you'd have to create a script which ran on login which defines ufw rules to govern the conneciton. You'd have to create one for yourself too in order to ensure that you don't inherit that profile when you login.

Dropbox is tricky since it uses Amazon ECS servers. It's an extensive list of target addresses. Something like :

ufw allow proto tcp from any to <target address 1> port 80
ufw allow proto tcp from any to <target address 2> port 80
...

Then to switch back to "your" profile, something like :

ufw reset
ufw enable

The full list of IP addresses is included at the bottom.

The allow/deny of programs can be achieved by configuring /etc/sudoers, but I'm not certain if you can restrict programs that don't require sudo. Well, you can, by changing the persmissions of /usr/bin for example, but it's not amazingly elegant. By which I mean, there's no nice GUI for doing so.

I'll try to add more detail once I'm sitting at my Ubuntu machine.

Dropbox IP addresses :

75.126.110.0/24
173.193.134.0/24
173.194.37.0/24
174.36.51.0/24
174.36.30.0/24
174.129.195.0/24
174.129.196.0/24
174.129.27.0/24
184.72.255.0/24
184.73.211.0/24
208.43.202.0/24
208.43.219.0/24
208.43.223.0/24
204.236.220.0/24
share|improve this answer

Did you consider using some parental control solution? You may find what you need on this thread on ubuntuforums.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.