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i built some packages myself using make & make install instead of apt-get because some packages in ubuntu repositories are not the latest version, sometimes not new enough to build some package depending on it. However when i wanted to install something by apt later, it told me that some dependencies didn't meet. So is there any chance that i can get apt to realize that there is something newer than the packages in its repositories?

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"i built some packages" what packages are those? "it told me that some dependencies didn't meet" what where those error messages? if you are not clear with the question, how could you expect one to help with such less information. Please try to provide more information about the packages,what you have tried and what came as output. –  VRU Feb 21 '13 at 6:22
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Yes, instead of using make install you can use the checkinstall utility.

What this does is instead of using make to copy all the required files directly to your file system, checkinstall runs make install in a virtual environment, waits till it completes, then compiles the resulting "installed" files into a .deb package.

The typical way of running checkinstall:

./configure
make
sudo checkinstall

During checkinstall you give the package a name and version number.

You can then install this .deb package with sudo dpkg -i packagename.deb and then dpkg (and therefore also APT) will know that this package is installed. (It won't, however, know what packages it depends on, but most stuff you compile yourself will be self-sufficient, maybe statically linked).

If the package name you chose matches the package name of a package in the repos, then it will be treated by APT as another choice of version for that package - and if it's higher than the version in the repos, it will by default leave it alone.

This is a relatively clean way to install things, too, because it lets you "uninstall" the software easily too.

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