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I have installed Windows and Ubuntu side by side on my system. I heard that it harmful to the hard disk if we access files ont the Windows partition from Ubuntu. Is this true?

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Yes, writing to files on a NTFS partition from Ubuntu can possibly harm your Windows installation. There are mainly two reasons for this:

  1. When accessed from Ubuntu Windows file permissions are not respected. This means we have full read and write access to files we may had flagged read-only or hidden from Windows. This also includes Windows system files which could be accidentally overwritten or even deleted from Ubuntu.

  2. When we hibernate Windows or use the Windows fast boot option (which is basically the same) the Windows OS is not aware of any changes we made to files on the drive. This may lead to data loss.

Nevertheless, and because we may need access to file we share from Ubuntu and from Windows it is not generally a bad idea to access files on a NTFS partition. When need to be careful what we do, and we may want to follow one ore more of the following precautions:

  • We may want to mount any Windows partitions as read-only. This has the disadvantage that we are unable to write file from Ubuntu but has the advantage of not being able to accidentally delete or alter files on that drive.
  • Do not hibernate when dual-booting. This also includes that we should not use the Windows fast boot option.
  • Keep shared data on a separate partition.
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ubuntu(ext) and window(NTFS) have different kind of partitions , in ubuntu you can mount a windows or NTFS partitons and access your file as a safe way, but if you want to do some modification and change in files so , keep be alert because both have different file saving, storing structure. so when you want to save files , in advanced option choose windows type to save and try to read this article:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_file_types

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