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I'm using Ubuntu 12.10 64BIT under my laptop, Asus K53E-B. Its hard disk drive volume 640GB.

I have 3 operation systems: Windows 7, Windows 8 (I just wanted try it), and Ubuntu 12.10.

I don't know how and why, but when I installed Ubuntu 12.10 I gave it 15GB, and after a month of using Ubuntu, it's starting to annoying. I mean, I can't install software, updates, new files etc.

I need your help:

How do I remove Windows 8 completely (I don't have important files there),

And extend Ubuntu partition, to at least 90GB? Even though I don't use Windows 7, I'd rather do it (i.e. extend Ubuntu's partition) without harm Windows 7. When I say "harm" - I mean extend Ubuntu , but Windows will still working. I don't mean don't reduce windows' space.

All what I've tried, including using Gparted under LiveCD - doesn't work. I guess I just don't know how to use it.

I really hope to get helped. Sorry for my bad English >.<

EDIT:

fdisk -l:

Disk /dev/sda: 640.1 GB, 640135028736 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 77825 cylinders, total 1250263728 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x98b324f9

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *    45062325   357622964   156280320    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
Partition 1 does not start on physical sector boundary.
/dev/sda2       357625854  1250263039   446318593    f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
Partition 2 does not start on physical sector boundary.
/dev/sda3            2048    32933887    16465920   83  Linux
/dev/sda4        32933888    45062143     6064128   82  Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda5       357625856  1109917507   376145826    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda6      1109919744  1110943743      512000   83  Linux
/dev/sda7      1110945792  1250263039    69658624   8e  Linux LVM

Partition table entries are not in disk order

Disk /dev/mapper/vg-lv_swap: 8187 MB, 8187281408 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 995 cylinders, total 15990784 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/mapper/vg-lv_swap doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/mapper/vg-lv_home: 21.0 GB, 21038628864 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 2557 cylinders, total 41091072 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/mapper/vg-lv_home doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/mapper/vg-lv_root: 42.1 GB, 42077257728 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 5115 cylinders, total 82182144 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/mapper/vg-lv_root doesn't contain a valid partition table
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As a temporary solution you can install bleachbit (if you haven't yet) and run it first as root and then as user to do a thorough cleaning and regain a lot of space. And to receive a good advice about partition resizing enter fdisk -l in terminal and then copy&paste its output here. –  Sadi Feb 18 '13 at 8:13
    
hi friend, normally an ubuntu 12.10 install itself should not go over 15 gb if it does not include your home folder. you can create a new partition for your home folder. Google that. With your setup it seems like a good option. My experience with resizing partitions is that the process is not flawless. Others might disagree. –  don.joey Feb 18 '13 at 8:30
    
@Private - I need the Applications and more folders rather than home only. –  Billie Feb 18 '13 at 11:32
    
@Sadi - pasted it. see edit. –  Billie Feb 18 '13 at 11:33
    
@user1798362 I don't understand what you say. My proposal: make one partition for your ubuntu 12.10 installation and one partition for all your files and extra's. –  don.joey Feb 18 '13 at 11:35

1 Answer 1

It seems there are some problems in your disk's partition table (very risk to try and fix it unless you're an expert on these matters). This might be the cause of the problem with resizing partitions.

You can try and use GParted on a Live CD/USB to perform a check on all these partitions. Perhaps GParted can fix those partition boundary issues.

Otherwise, you can also try and reduce the size of a partition adjacent to your Ubuntu partition, and then try and increase the size of your Ubuntu partition to include the new free space (immediately before or after it).

If these cannot resolve the problem, I think you have 2 options left:

  1. An expert work on disk partition table (after backing up all data in all partitions)
  2. Another solution to space problem in your Ubuntu partition by (i) regularly cleaning your system via software tools like bleachbit, and/or (ii) using other partition(s) for user data, e.g. Documents, Music, Pictures, Video, Mails, etc. by using symbolic links, etc.
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