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I have successfully installed Windows 7 and Ubuntu 12.04.2 on seperate SSD drive. Used the attach/detach method to instal. I detached disk2 (Ubuntu Drive) then installed Windows 7 on disk1. Then I disconnected disk1, connected disk2 and installed Ubuntu. I read this was a good way to do it as it will prevent Grub2 from overwriting the Windows bootloader.

Not both disk1 and disk2 are hooked up and I can now boot in to each OS successfully by selecting the various disk at BIOS level. I would like to skip the BIOS and auto boot into Ubuntu then use Grub2 to select if I want to boot into Windows 7.

Grub2 is not working for me and I was thinking about using Boot Repair to repair Grub2 from a LiveUSB. My worry though, is that if I run Boot Repair, it will overwrite my windows bootloader? Should I run Boot Repair with my windows drive unhooked?

What are your thoughts to get Grub2 working with out touching disk2?

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2 Answers 2

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If you connect both disk1 (Win7) and disk2 (Ubuntu) and set your BIOS to boot first disk2 (i.e. Ubuntu), you should be able to update grub2, which is on disk2, without overwriting Win7 bootloader, which is on disk1, and have Win7 included in the grub menu by entering this command in terminal: sudo update-grub

If you want to be on the safe side, you can have your Win7 installation CD ready or a recovery CD created in Windows to easily restore Win7 bootloader any time when it gets overwritten accidentally (e.g. if you attempt to install grub2 by mistake to Win7 disk).

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My worry though, is that if I run Boot Repair, it will overwrite my windows bootloader?

No. Boot-Repair cannot overwrite the Windows bootloader. It can only install GRUB bootloader which will call the Windows bootloader.

Should I run Boot Repair with my windows drive unhooked?

Yes, you can do it, but then you will have to set up your BIOS so that it boots your Ubuntu disk first.

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