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When I run "$ dpkg -l linux-image" I get:

Desired=Unknown/Install/Remove/Purge/Hold
| Status=Not/Inst/Conf-files/Unpacked/halF-conf/Half-inst/trig-aWait/Trig-pend
|/ Err?=(none)/Reinst-required (Status,Err: uppercase=bad)
||/ Name           Version        Description
+++-==============-==============-============================================
un  linux-image    <none>         (no description available)

What does it mean? I've been paranoid that my Ubuntu install thinks it's up to date when it's not, due to flaky WiFi connection at work when I was installing it...

But can anyone explain to me what the output of that command means? I wanna be able to troubleshoot things like this (assuming it is an actual problem) in the future.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
No idea what it means but I see the exact same thing and I'm quite happy with regular updates :) ... Re. updates, you could look at UbuntuUpdates.org which allows you to filter according to OS, ppa, etc. –  user25656 Feb 14 '13 at 16:28
    
Oh. Wow. LOL I just started re-installing because of this crap. –  oaskamay Feb 14 '13 at 16:29
    
What did you expect to happen when passed that command? –  carnendil Feb 14 '13 at 16:34
    
@carnendil, well I wasn't expecting anything. But what came out certainly doesn't look right to me (though it might actually be fine). I re-installed Ubuntu because of the updating issue I had that I described in my question. –  oaskamay Feb 14 '13 at 17:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's nothing wrong with the output you see. As I mentioned in my comment, when I ran that command, I saw the same thing.
If you look elsewhere on the 'net using "dpkg -l linux-image" in a Google Search, you may find this question: Blocking kernel updates with dpkg. Then look at this answer there.
You'll see that the top five lines are exactly what you saw. The actual data depends on what you include after dpkg -l. By putting linux-image exactly, nothing was found for you or for me but if you try linux-image*, you'll get a more reassuring picture.

un  linux-image                        <none>                                        (no description available)
un  linux-image-3.0                    <none>                                        (no description available)
rc  linux-image-3.5.0-15-generic       3.5.0-15.23            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
rc  linux-image-3.5.0-17-generic       3.5.0-17.28            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.5.0-18-generic       3.5.0-18.29            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.5.0-19-generic       3.5.0-19.30            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.5.0-21-generic       3.5.0-21.32            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.5.0-22-generic       3.5.0-22.34            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.5.0-23-generic       3.5.0-23.35            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
rc  linux-image-extra-3.5.0-15-generic 3.5.0-15.23            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
rc  linux-image-extra-3.5.0-17-generic 3.5.0-17.28            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
rc  linux-image-extra-3.5.0-18-generic 3.5.0-18.29            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
rc  linux-image-extra-3.5.0-19-generic 3.5.0-19.30            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-extra-3.5.0-21-generic 3.5.0-21.32            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-extra-3.5.0-22-generic 3.5.0-22.34            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-extra-3.5.0-23-generic 3.5.0-23.35            i386                   Linux kernel image for version 3.5.0 on 32 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-generic                3.5.0.23.29            i386                   Generic Linux kernel image
[10:21 PM] ~ $ 

Where un most like can be ignored and where ii means installed.

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Thank you! This adds some more clarity to my situation. –  oaskamay Feb 14 '13 at 17:17
1  
Hey, we both learned something! –  user25656 Feb 14 '13 at 17:18

linux-image is only a meta-package that depends on linux-image-generic which itself depends on "the latest generic kernel". Both are not installed by default on Ubuntu.

You can see those details for yourself with aptitude search linux-image (which gives a list with existing packages whose names contain 'linux-image') and for any single package type apt-cache show linux-image.

share|improve this answer
    
I see. Thank you for your clarification. It's things like this (things just suddenly get crystal clear thanks to people like you in these help sites) that make me happy! I'll try it out once I'm done updating my new install. –  oaskamay Feb 14 '13 at 17:14

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