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I installed Ubuntu 12.10 onto an external hard drive after I partitioned it and everything went well. Assuming I could boot Ubuntu I rebooted the computer and I went into Windows 7, I wanted to be in Ubuntu so I rebooted. I received the no such device grub rescue error when I booted.

I tried boot option, the external hard drive was not option so now I'm stuck using the Ubuntu disk. I tried with GRUB rescue through terminal but Ubuntu was located at /dev/sdd5 366683648 699115007 1329725440 83 Linux which was not recognized

so i tried the GRUB rescue windows by entering sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt and I received this:

mount: special device /dev/sda1 does not exist

even though when I entered fdisk -l the report said:

Device Boot  Start   End    Blocks   Id    System
 /dev/sda1    63    80324   40131    de  Dell Utility

I tried super grub disk 2, it found Windows 7 but could not recover without reverting to previous save. It suggested that I unplug all external devices and retry. After I unplugged all devices super grub disk 2 could not find the OS. I ran sudo fdisk -l and received the same list as before.

There is also another problem and I believe they are related when i enter ls into the grub rescue command prompt I get (hd0) (hd0,msdos3) (hd0,msdos2) (hd0,msdos1) not the normal (hd0) (hd0,Y) (hd0,W) etc.

I tried ls (hd0) /boot the message I received was no such file system.

UPDATE: I tried ubfan1's suggestion but I can't seem to mount it

sudo mount /dev/sde5 /mnt && sudo mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev && sudo mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc && sudo mount --bind /sys /mnt/sys  && sudo mount --bind /dev/pts /mnt/dev/pts && sudo cp /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/etc/resolv.conf && sudo chroot /mnt  

I recieved the error message:

chroot: cannot change root directory to /mn: No such file or directory  

Is the error my code or something else?

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That error probably means you have a typo. My guess is that you deleted the last t, leaving you with sudo chroot /mn instead of sudo chroot /mnt. –  strugee May 26 '13 at 20:24
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2 Answers 2

If you installed from a USB live media, you are probably experiencing bug 384633, where the initial creation of the grub boot config file uses a wrong device instead of a UUID. If you can boot off the live media, you can reinstall grub to the external usb disk, and that should fix the grub config file. You can also edit the grub boot commands (commands on screen to edit and boot) to fix the wrong devices. For the last few years, the fix was to simply reduce the disk letter or number by one, and upon successful boot, immediately run

 sudo update-grub

With 12.10, the wrong device has changed, it may even be sda (which is usualy the internal hard disk). In 12.10, I have started seeing the disk lettering change, with the internal hard disk sometimes sdb instead of sda -- not even consistent. But after the update-grub, UUIDs will be used, and the disk letter will no longer matter. Feel free to add yourself to the bug, and maybe someday it will be fixed.

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Here is what you need to do:

  1. Burn an Ubuntu ISO image onto a USB Drive or a DVD to make a Live USB/DVD.
  2. Boot into Live mode ("Try Ubuntu" option).
  3. After it boots up, press "Ctrl + Alt + T" to bring up the Terminal.
  4. Put these codes ONE AFTER ANOTHER.

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install boot-repair

  1. After doing this, open the "Dash" (Search menu). It can be accessed by "Alt + F2"

  2. Search for "Boot Repair" (Although just entering Boot will give you the app).

  3. Open it and select the only option (Recommended one).

  4. Reboot. You will no longer get the GRUB Error after this, and will boot straight into Windows.

You can also do it with Ubuntu installed. In case you want to Uninstall ubuntu, first follow the above instructions, then after you are in Windows, install EASUS Partition Manager and delete the Ubuntu partitions (the ones that are NOT ntfs formatted)

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