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in Windows, a programmer can use Windows API to write a Windows application. Windows API can be used with C (not necessarily C++). In Windows API you have a message loop and you have to program responses to different messages (eg a right click on client area).

Is there any ubuntu API?

I don't mean Qt or GTK. I'm looking for a raw (C/C++) API so that everything must be (re)designed.

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I'm not completely sure about what kind of API you're talking about. All libraries on the system have their own - there's no such thing as a single API for the whole OS! Are you referring to libc, standard libraries or "standard" libraries like Xorg? The Windows world and its Win32 API is not a pattern to apply to all other OSs. Linux is not designed like that. –  gertvdijk Feb 1 '13 at 21:22
    
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@UriHerrera That's about Python desktop applications. How does that apply to this C/C++ question? –  gertvdijk Feb 1 '13 at 21:23
    
@gertvdijk I was thinking more along the lines of he wanting to create software thus asking for an Ubuntu API. –  Uri Herrera Feb 1 '13 at 21:24

2 Answers 2

I came to Linux from a Win32 API background. Because Windows wraps up the equivalent of the Linux window manager and desktop environment into a single container, there just isn't a one-to-one match. Gtk and Qt really are more or less the equivalent to the Win API.

Keeping in mind that the Win API itself in most cases is a wrapper on lower levels, if you really want to get down into the low-levels of the windowing system, you can look at X11 programming. For example, X Window System and Brief Intro to X11 Programming. But Gtk and Qt are designed to be wrappers around these functions.

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I hope this is what you are looking for:
http://developer.ubuntu.com/resources/platform/api/

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That's a nice website listing most APIs used for a native application. Nice! –  gertvdijk Feb 1 '13 at 21:31

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