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I want nothing to do with Windows. The only methods I see for installing Ubuntu on a Windows 8 computer involve booting windows and restarting to change settings. However, this requires first agreeing to Windows' terms of service. I really don't want to do that if I can avoid it.

I have a brand new Samsung Series 3 Notebook.

I don't want to dual-boot, and I don't want to partition. I want to preemptively scrub away all traces of Windows before using my computer. What are my options?

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4 Answers 4

Like any other Operating System, Windows is called by the firmware (BIOS or UEFI).

So if you delete Windows, you will still be able to install Ubuntu. Then when you boot your computer, the firmware will load Ubuntu directly.

Remark: for Windows8 computers, the firmware is UEFI type. After erasing Windows8, you will probably need to follow the instructions of the 1st paragraph of the UEFI Ubuntu Community Doc.

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I'm not sure for certain, but I believe the BIOS is before windows. So, yes, i think you can boot ubuntu before Windows. And if not, you can quickly go through windows and do an immidate install of ubuntu erasing windows from your laptop.

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I have recently installed Ubuntu 12.04LTS on a Samsung NP355V5C, which is I think a series 3, and did not boot into windows at all. It is very easy.

As pointed out, you need an install CD or a UEFI boot USB. To do this, you can buy one, ask a friend to create one on his computer, or you could get the windows-8 set up on your PC, just to create the UEFI booting USB. When you have a USB ready, but not plugged in to the Samsung, switch the laptop on while holding down F2 to get to the BIOS. In here I altered the boot option to disable secure boot, but this is probably not necessary.

Windows 8 does not bypass the BIOS, but the BIOS is set to run the windows startup programs (you can see the setting in the BIOS). This disappears when you disable secure boot, but if you do want secure boot you can have it with ubuntu 12.10.

Reboot with the USB inserted, and take the options to install ubuntu as the sole operating system. This WILL create partitions and scrub off the windows-8, but if you just take the default options it does this automatically without you being aware of it. You (after restarting when prompted) will then be running the laptop 100% in ubuntu.

Everything I want works - sound, ethernet, wifi, DVD, etc. But if your laptop is an AMD processor like mine, in the ubuntu additional drivers you should select "ATI/AMD proprietary FGLRX graphics driver" to get resizeable starter icons and (they say) better graphic performance.

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Use somebody else's computer to burn a live cd or make a live usb. Boot your new computer from that, install your linux of choice and you will have never had to boot into the windows environment. There are also places to buy a live cd or live usb if you don't have access to another computer.

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I have not tried, but I'm told that Windows 8 bypasses the BIOS, and that I won't be able to boot from CD without loading Windows and disabling certain settings. –  The Mighty Khan Jan 27 '13 at 0:08
    
Your computer probably has UEFI instead of BIOS. There are supposed to be advantages to this such as IPv6 support, faster boot times, etc. UEFI relies on a special partition to tell it where and how to boot. I am not very familiar with UEFI but here is the Wikipedia page on UEFI. I know other people have had trouble getting ubuntu to play nicely with UEFI, but it should be possible to edit the settings for your bootup cycle before Windows begins. Try contacting Samsung Support. –  starrysky Jan 27 '13 at 0:40

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