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I used to have a boot time of ~35 seconds till 2-3 months back. Now it is about ~50 seconds or more. Shut down time has also doubled. Before it used to be at most 5 seconds. Now it is at-least 10 seconds.

  • What is causing this ?
  • More importantly, how do i reduce it ?

My laptop is an Asus U32U - RX012D. It has mostly development software and related files on it.


Bootchart image linked. Another one.

Some extra information :

  • Hard drive usage is 15GB of a total of 320GB

  • Swappiness is 1

  • Preload doesnt work and it has been confirmed to be a bug

  • Some unneccesary start-up services are disabled


  • Defragmented root directory. No change in performance.

Feel free to ask for any relevant information.

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I don't know why, after reading the title, it said 25% faster boot time. I think am having one of those 25% faster days. –  Luis Alvarado Feb 8 '13 at 16:44

3 Answers 3

If you want to know exactly what is taking time to boot your system:

At this point you can analyse what program is taking up time during boottime but if you want to exactly know where that 25% increase comes from then...

  • Create a backup of your personal files and personal settings
  • Re-install your system,
  • Install all the software you are using now and re-install your personal files.
  • Create a new bootchart.

Drastic but when you compare the two images the differences in the images will answer your question to the second exactly. The first time you do this it will be a lot of work and cost a fair amount of time and I can do this fairly quick now because I also set up my machine with a small root and small home since all my files are stored on a separate disc (so I know I can delete root and home w/o thinking twice). But this is the method I use before I switch over to a new release to see if the new release has improved or deteriorated my boot time and I also always keep a bootchart saved from just after I installed the new release.


Installation of bootchart can be done by clicking the image below:

Install via the software center

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"Re-install your system" A little extreme, dont you think ? –  AsheeshR Feb 11 '13 at 1:37
    
I am aware it is @AshRj 2 things: 1/ my post contains a break between analyzing the current bootchart yourself and the remainder of the answer. 2/ If someone needs to absolutely know what the differences are you must have a PRE and a POST situation and if it was not set up from the start it will be guesswork. I like to deal with -facts-. Even if that involves a re-install to get those facts. The main part of this question What is causing this ? is impossible to answer w/o setting it up so you can examine why. –  Rinzwind Feb 11 '13 at 8:25

There are many aspects to consider on this subject (from kernel settings to startup services).

Some potentially useful info can be found here: http://linuxpoison.blogspot.pt/2011/01/easy-steps-to-tune-up-your-ubuntu.html

Hope it helps!

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6  
Hi! While this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. –  user25656 Jan 26 '13 at 2:57

A few recommendations:

  1. I'd first recommend that you disable any unnecessary services.
  2. Check your disk for errors using badblocks and/or smartctl.
  3. If you're using a lot of space you may want to try to do a defrag using (ext4 only) e4defrag.
  4. Setup and install preload.
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