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It appears that enabling UFW is causing my network connection to drop periodically on a WPA-Enterprise network, according to the network-manager GUI app (and the lack of a server response to web browsing for a minute or so while it is out). Is this because UFW is preventing something needed for WPA or DHCP when configured with the defaults?

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closed as too localized by Luis Mar 14 '13 at 17:01

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I guess everything works fine when you disable UFW? –  David Z Aug 17 '10 at 6:09
    
Which firewall rules have you set up? –  Source Lab Aug 17 '10 at 9:08
    
Did the answer below answer your problem. –  Luis Dec 6 '11 at 22:28

1 Answer 1

I'm running 10.04 on a Dell X300 (old) laptop with ufw enabled (through GUFW gui tool : sudo apt-get install gufw, then configure from system/administration/firewall configuration).

We use a non-hidden SSID configured with WPA2 and PEAP authentication. No issues.

UFW is configured as default - deny all incoming, allow all outgoing.

As a result, DHCP should be unaffected since technically it's outbound traffic (a network broadcast to the local subnet), to which the DHCP server responds appropriately.

Like the commenters above, I presume that everything works if you disable UFW (sudo ufw disable)? If so, further investigation required - perhaps a look at /var/log/messages or similar.

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