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I have a boot drive which I don't want to show up in nautilus. How do I edit /etc/fstab so that the boot drive doesn't show up as a mountable device.

device

Current /etc/fstab:

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
proc            /proc           proc    nodev,noexec,nosuid 0       0
# / was on /dev/sda2 during installation
UUID=595815c2-d882-4ec8-a2cd-cce70471167c /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# /boot was on /dev/sda6 during installation
#UUID=1340a336-66ca-4743-a6e4-41a307af2dda /boot           ext4    defaults        0       3
# swap was on /dev/sda5 during installation
UUID=afa49f1d-d505-4166-82a2-2f44548a48c6 none            swap    sw              0       0

UUID=deb86039-528a-45f3-b5f9-ce528740c94e /data_hdd ext4    defaults    0   2

The drive shows up in Unity's launcher as well:

enter image description here

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Nautilus does not use /etc/fstab to determine which drives to show in the left-hand pane. I guess there may be a setting somewhere in Nautilus configs to hide the Devices section, but it's completely unrelated to /etc/fstab –  Sergey Jan 4 '13 at 21:29
    
Not only nautilus, but Unity's launcher as well (editted question). –  mreq Jan 4 '13 at 21:31
    
So what are you trying to do - just delete the icons for aesthetic purposes or to prevent user's access outside of their home directory? The user can also launch terminal and run ls /, which will show the contents of the drive - is it a problem? –  Sergey Jan 4 '13 at 21:42
    
Sergey: it's purely aesthetic, since the /boot drive is unusable/irrelevant for the user. It's a one-user pc. –  mreq Jan 4 '13 at 21:43
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You'll need to create a configuration file for udev.

Run gksu gedit /etc/udev/rules.d/hidden-partition.rules, and paste in the following content:

#sould be placed into /etc/udev/rules.d/
ACTION!="add|change", GOTO="hide_partitions_end"
SUBSYSTEM!="block", GOTO="hide_partitions_end"
KERNEL=="loop*|ram*", GOTO="hide_partitions_end"

################################################## ############################

#Hide sda6
KERNEL=="sda6", ENV{UDISKS_PRESENTATION_HIDE}="1"

################################################## ############################

LABEL="hide_partitions_end"

The boot partition should be gone after reboot.

PS: The method has been working well for me for hiding a Windows partition. I've don't have a boot partition to test, but hope it will work as well.

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Great, works like a charm. –  mreq Jan 4 '13 at 21:51
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